2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159322
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attentional Demands in Early Dementia -A Preliminary Study in Taiwan
Abstract:
Attentional Demands in Early Dementia -A Preliminary Study in Taiwan
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Chiu, Yi-Chen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Chang-Gung University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 259 Wenhaw 1st Rd, Kewishan, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan
Contact Telephone:886-3-2118800-5148
Co-Authors:Hsiu-Chih Liu, MD; Ker-Neng Lin, PhD; Yi-Chen Kuo, MD, Director; and Be-Ing Hsiao, MSN(c), Public Health Nurse
Attentional Demands in Early Dementia -A Preliminary Study in Taiwan
In the early stage of Alzheimer disease (AD), symptoms are characterized
at the behavioral level by deficits in memory, language, and perception,
as well as by decreased efficiency in everyday tasks, spatial
disorientation, and disturbances of mood. Although the first nonamnestic
neuropsychological consequence of AD is a loss of attentional capacity,
memory problem has generated by far the most research interest. Therefore,
this study focused on exploring the relationships between attention,
attentional demands, and social support as a mediator between these two
variables. The theory used in this study is the directed attention
framework. With a cross-sectional design, 40 normal elderly controls and
25 early AD patients (total n=65) were recruited from a memory disorder
clinic at a teaching hospital in Northern Taiwan. A test battery of
directed attention, attentional demands and social support as well as
global cognitive measurements was administered. Findings indicated that
there was no significant relationship between the capacity of directed
attention and attentional demands (r=-.28, p > .05), while social support
was positively and significantly related to the capacity of directed
attention (r=.35, p < .01), and negatively as well as significantly
associated with attentional demands (r=-.47, p < .01). In conclusion,
social support may act as a mediator between the capacity of directed
attention and attentional demands even though there was no direct
relationship between the capacity of directed attention and attentional
demands. Nursing interventions can target on providing social support to
reduce attentional demands.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttentional Demands in Early Dementia -A Preliminary Study in Taiwanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159322-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attentional Demands in Early Dementia -A Preliminary Study in Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chiu, Yi-Chen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chang-Gung University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 259 Wenhaw 1st Rd, Kewishan, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">886-3-2118800-5148</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yulandac@mail.cgu.edu.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hsiu-Chih Liu, MD; Ker-Neng Lin, PhD; Yi-Chen Kuo, MD, Director; and Be-Ing Hsiao, MSN(c), Public Health Nurse</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Attentional Demands in Early Dementia -A Preliminary Study in Taiwan <br/> In the early stage of Alzheimer disease (AD), symptoms are characterized <br/> at the behavioral level by deficits in memory, language, and perception, <br/> as well as by decreased efficiency in everyday tasks, spatial <br/> disorientation, and disturbances of mood. Although the first nonamnestic <br/> neuropsychological consequence of AD is a loss of attentional capacity, <br/> memory problem has generated by far the most research interest. Therefore, <br/> this study focused on exploring the relationships between attention, <br/> attentional demands, and social support as a mediator between these two <br/> variables. The theory used in this study is the directed attention <br/> framework. With a cross-sectional design, 40 normal elderly controls and <br/> 25 early AD patients (total n=65) were recruited from a memory disorder <br/> clinic at a teaching hospital in Northern Taiwan. A test battery of <br/> directed attention, attentional demands and social support as well as <br/> global cognitive measurements was administered. Findings indicated that <br/> there was no significant relationship between the capacity of directed <br/> attention and attentional demands (r=-.28, p &gt; .05), while social support <br/> was positively and significantly related to the capacity of directed <br/> attention (r=.35, p &lt; .01), and negatively as well as significantly <br/> associated with attentional demands (r=-.47, p &lt; .01). In conclusion, <br/> social support may act as a mediator between the capacity of directed <br/> attention and attentional demands even though there was no direct <br/> relationship between the capacity of directed attention and attentional <br/> demands. Nursing interventions can target on providing social support to <br/> reduce attentional demands.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:54:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:54:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.