2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159323
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community Integration for Stroke Survivors
Abstract:
Community Integration for Stroke Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Coeling, Harriet, PhD, MS, BSN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8787
Co-Authors:Nichole Egbert, PhD, MA, BA, Assistant Professor and Lynn Koch, PhD, MA, BA
Community Integration for Stroke Survivors Purpose: Many Stroke
Survivors (SSs) have both the potential and the desire to resume
involvement in family and community activities post stroke; yet they do
not do so. This resumption of activities is called community integration.
Although it is has been found that many SSs fail to reach their potential
levels of community integration post-stroke, little research has
identified factors that enhance this integration. The purpose of this
study was to identify facilitators of community integration. Conceptual
Framework: The Enablement Model of Willer, Button and Corrigan (1997),
which describes the relationship between supports and community
integration, served as the study's framework. Subjects: 12 SS and primary
caregiver dyads (N=24 individuals) participated in this study. Method: In
this grounded theory, qualitative research design study participants were
interviewed concurrently and independently. The interview protocol,
developed by researchers from nursing, health communication, and
rehabilitation, addressed stroke-related challenges, compensatory
strategies, and resources. Interviews, lasting 60 - 90 minutes, were
audio-taped and transcribed. Data analysis consisted of open, axial, and
selective coding. The master coding scheme was continuously revised
through a process of constant comparison of new data to emerging
categories. Transcripts were-re-analyzed to reflect coding revisions.
Results: Facilitators of community integration included formal external
resources (healthcare providers and support groups), informal external
resources (family and friends), and internal resources (patience,
motivation, positivity, and humor). Successful integration was found to be
less dependent on severity of disability than availability of resources.
Conclusions: The finding that external resources activated internal
resources which in turn reinforced external resources led researchers to
develop the Reciprocal Model of Community Integration. Because these three
types of resources are reciprocally linked, nursing interventions targeted
at any of these points may enhance community integration. It is
anticipated that activating several resources at once can further
strengthen integration.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity Integration for Stroke Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159323-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community Integration for Stroke Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coeling, Harriet, PhD, MS, BSN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8787</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hcoeling@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nichole Egbert, PhD, MA, BA, Assistant Professor and Lynn Koch, PhD, MA, BA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Community Integration for Stroke Survivors Purpose: Many Stroke <br/> Survivors (SSs) have both the potential and the desire to resume <br/> involvement in family and community activities post stroke; yet they do <br/> not do so. This resumption of activities is called community integration. <br/> Although it is has been found that many SSs fail to reach their potential <br/> levels of community integration post-stroke, little research has <br/> identified factors that enhance this integration. The purpose of this <br/> study was to identify facilitators of community integration. Conceptual <br/> Framework: The Enablement Model of Willer, Button and Corrigan (1997), <br/> which describes the relationship between supports and community <br/> integration, served as the study's framework. Subjects: 12 SS and primary <br/> caregiver dyads (N=24 individuals) participated in this study. Method: In <br/> this grounded theory, qualitative research design study participants were <br/> interviewed concurrently and independently. The interview protocol, <br/> developed by researchers from nursing, health communication, and <br/> rehabilitation, addressed stroke-related challenges, compensatory <br/> strategies, and resources. Interviews, lasting 60 - 90 minutes, were <br/> audio-taped and transcribed. Data analysis consisted of open, axial, and <br/> selective coding. The master coding scheme was continuously revised <br/> through a process of constant comparison of new data to emerging <br/> categories. Transcripts were-re-analyzed to reflect coding revisions. <br/> Results: Facilitators of community integration included formal external <br/> resources (healthcare providers and support groups), informal external <br/> resources (family and friends), and internal resources (patience, <br/> motivation, positivity, and humor). Successful integration was found to be <br/> less dependent on severity of disability than availability of resources. <br/> Conclusions: The finding that external resources activated internal <br/> resources which in turn reinforced external resources led researchers to <br/> develop the Reciprocal Model of Community Integration. Because these three <br/> types of resources are reciprocally linked, nursing interventions targeted <br/> at any of these points may enhance community integration. It is <br/> anticipated that activating several resources at once can further <br/> strengthen integration.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:54:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:54:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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