2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159324
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complexity in focus group research: Analyzing the group effect
Abstract:
Complexity in focus group research: Analyzing the group effect
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Connelly, Lynne, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center- San Antonio
Title:Associate Dean
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229-3900, USA
Contact Telephone:(210) 567-0112
Co-Authors:Debra D. Mark, PhD, RN
One of the frequently stated advantages of focus group research is
that these "group interviews" allow researchers to examine how the group
interactions affected people's perceptions and decision-making. On the
other hand, one of the frequent criticisms of reports of focus groups is
there is no analysis of group processes. In a study using focus groups to
describe military health care provider's perceptions of their experience
when deployed to Iraq, we developed a method to examine specifically the
group processes. From past experience, one of the authors found after
several focus groups they tended to blur together and with only interview
data to refer to it was hard to analyze the group process. To overcome
this problem, we developed a series of questions that specifically
addressed group interactions. Examples of these questions were: what did
you think of the group? What was the tone? Were there dominant
personalities in the group? Who were the quiet participants? Did this
affect the group? Were there gender and hierarchical issues? How did they
effect communication? Did anyone indicate a change in thinking because of
remarks made by another participant? The last question was to describe how
this focus group compared to other groups. Immediately after the focus
group, the research team members who observed the focus group would meet
and discuss these questions before reviewing anything else. In addition,
each person would write out their observations to the questions on a group
interaction contact sheet. This process allowed us to specifically address
the group process and produce data for further analysis. We found the
results of this process to be helpful and meaningful in examining and
reporting the group effect and cross-group comparisons in our study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComplexity in focus group research: Analyzing the group effecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159324-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Complexity in focus group research: Analyzing the group effect</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Connelly, Lynne, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center- San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229-3900, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(210) 567-0112</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">connelly@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Debra D. Mark, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">One of the frequently stated advantages of focus group research is <br/> that these &quot;group interviews&quot; allow researchers to examine how the group <br/> interactions affected people's perceptions and decision-making. On the <br/> other hand, one of the frequent criticisms of reports of focus groups is <br/> there is no analysis of group processes. In a study using focus groups to <br/> describe military health care provider's perceptions of their experience <br/> when deployed to Iraq, we developed a method to examine specifically the <br/> group processes. From past experience, one of the authors found after <br/> several focus groups they tended to blur together and with only interview <br/> data to refer to it was hard to analyze the group process. To overcome <br/> this problem, we developed a series of questions that specifically <br/> addressed group interactions. Examples of these questions were: what did <br/> you think of the group? What was the tone? Were there dominant <br/> personalities in the group? Who were the quiet participants? Did this <br/> affect the group? Were there gender and hierarchical issues? How did they <br/> effect communication? Did anyone indicate a change in thinking because of <br/> remarks made by another participant? The last question was to describe how <br/> this focus group compared to other groups. Immediately after the focus <br/> group, the research team members who observed the focus group would meet <br/> and discuss these questions before reviewing anything else. In addition, <br/> each person would write out their observations to the questions on a group <br/> interaction contact sheet. This process allowed us to specifically address <br/> the group process and produce data for further analysis. We found the <br/> results of this process to be helpful and meaningful in examining and <br/> reporting the group effect and cross-group comparisons in our study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:54:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:54:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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