Impoverished Self-Concept: A Cognitive Vulnerability for Early Problem Alcohol Use in Adolescents with High Antisociality

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159325
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impoverished Self-Concept: A Cognitive Vulnerability for Early Problem Alcohol Use in Adolescents with High Antisociality
Abstract:
Impoverished Self-Concept: A Cognitive Vulnerability for Early Problem Alcohol Use in Adolescents with High Antisociality
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Corte, Colleen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-7025
Co-Authors:Robert A. Zucker, PhD, Professor and Hiram E. Fitzgerald, PhD, Professor
A recent study found that young adults with antisocial alcoholism
(AAL) had an impoverished self-concept--few positive and many negative
domains of self-definition--that predicted high levels of alcohol use
(Corte & Stein, 2004). It is unclear, however, whether the impoverished
self was a contributor to or a consequence of AAL. This study explores
relationships between the impoverished self and drinking outcomes in
adolescents 12-14 (n=332) and 15-17 (n=302) at risk for AAL from the
Michigan Longitudinal Study, using a cognitive model of the self.
Differences in the number of positive and negative self-definitions were
examined using items endorsed as "really true of me" from the Harter
Self-Perception Profile. Outcomes included age of drinking onset and age
of first drunk episode (study's drinking/drug questionnaire). Survival
analysis showed that adolescents with an impoverished self had an earlier
drinking onset than adolescents with a well-developed self (12.78 years vs
14.03 years, p<.001). Linear regression using positive (POS) and negative
(NEG) self-definitions, and known risk factors for AAL--paternal
alcoholism and antisociality--predicted age of first drunk episode,
R2=.27, F(10,115)=4.23, p<000. Two interactions were found: (1) POS X NEG
and (2) NEG X ANTISOCIALITY. Analysis of simple slopes showed that (1) as
the number of negative self-definitions increased, the age of first drunk
episode was earlier, but only for adolescents with few positive
self-definitions (p<.000), and (2) as antisociality increased, the age of
first drunk episode was earlier, but the effect was stronger for those
with many negative self-definitions (p<.000) compared to those with few
negative self-definitions (p<.06). Results suggest that an impoverished
self is a cognitive vulnerability for early problem alcohol use in
adolescents with high antisociality. Interventions designed to foster a
well-developed self-concept may delay drinking onset and prevent alcohol
problems in children at risk for AAL. NIAAA R37AA07065 & T32AA0747
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpoverished Self-Concept: A Cognitive Vulnerability for Early Problem Alcohol Use in Adolescents with High Antisocialityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159325-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impoverished Self-Concept: A Cognitive Vulnerability for Early Problem Alcohol Use in Adolescents with High Antisociality</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Corte, Colleen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-7025</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ccorte@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Robert A. Zucker, PhD, Professor and Hiram E. Fitzgerald, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A recent study found that young adults with antisocial alcoholism <br/> (AAL) had an impoverished self-concept--few positive and many negative <br/> domains of self-definition--that predicted high levels of alcohol use <br/> (Corte &amp; Stein, 2004). It is unclear, however, whether the impoverished <br/> self was a contributor to or a consequence of AAL. This study explores <br/> relationships between the impoverished self and drinking outcomes in <br/> adolescents 12-14 (n=332) and 15-17 (n=302) at risk for AAL from the <br/> Michigan Longitudinal Study, using a cognitive model of the self. <br/> Differences in the number of positive and negative self-definitions were <br/> examined using items endorsed as &quot;really true of me&quot; from the Harter <br/> Self-Perception Profile. Outcomes included age of drinking onset and age <br/> of first drunk episode (study's drinking/drug questionnaire). Survival <br/> analysis showed that adolescents with an impoverished self had an earlier <br/> drinking onset than adolescents with a well-developed self (12.78 years vs <br/> 14.03 years, p&lt;.001). Linear regression using positive (POS) and negative <br/> (NEG) self-definitions, and known risk factors for AAL--paternal <br/> alcoholism and antisociality--predicted age of first drunk episode, <br/> R2=.27, F(10,115)=4.23, p&lt;000. Two interactions were found: (1) POS X NEG <br/> and (2) NEG X ANTISOCIALITY. Analysis of simple slopes showed that (1) as <br/> the number of negative self-definitions increased, the age of first drunk <br/> episode was earlier, but only for adolescents with few positive <br/> self-definitions (p&lt;.000), and (2) as antisociality increased, the age of <br/> first drunk episode was earlier, but the effect was stronger for those <br/> with many negative self-definitions (p&lt;.000) compared to those with few <br/> negative self-definitions (p&lt;.06). Results suggest that an impoverished <br/> self is a cognitive vulnerability for early problem alcohol use in <br/> adolescents with high antisociality. Interventions designed to foster a <br/> well-developed self-concept may delay drinking onset and prevent alcohol <br/> problems in children at risk for AAL. NIAAA R37AA07065 &amp; T32AA0747</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:54:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:54:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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