Interaction Patterns of Adolescents with Depression and the Important Adults in the Lives

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159332
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interaction Patterns of Adolescents with Depression and the Important Adults in the Lives
Abstract:
Interaction Patterns of Adolescents with Depression and the Important Adults in the Lives
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Draucker, Claire, PhD, RN, CS
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44236, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8805
The one-year prevalence of Major Depressive Disorder in adolescents is
thought to be as high as 8%, and yet few depressed adolescents receive
specialty mental health services. Relationships among depressed
adolescents and important adults in their lives significantly influence
the expression and course of the depression, including mental health
service use, but no studies have provided an in-depth description of these
relationships. The purpose of this study is to describe common interaction
patterns of adolescents who are depressed and important adults in their
lives, with special attention given to interactions that influence the
trajectory of the depression and service use. Data are drawn from a
grounded theory study of the adolescent depression. Open-ended interviews
were conducted with 52 community-dwelling young adults between the ages of
18 and 21 who experienced depressive symptoms as adolescents, four of
their parents, and eight professionals who work with depressed youth.
Participants were asked about their experiences with, or responses to,
adolescent depression. For this study, narrative data regarding
adolescent/adult relationships were examined. Constant comparison methods
were used to develop a theoretical framework. All participants discussed
how both adolescents and important adults ignore, hide or minimize the
adolescents' distress by acting "as if" things are fine; that is, they
create a facade of normality. The concept of the facade is the central
construct in the framework, which is comprised of the following elements:
(a) three common interaction patterns (maintaining the facade, poking
holes in the facade, breaking down the facade), (b) several adult and
adolescent actions that constitute each pattern, and (c) two adult and
adolescent strategies frequently used to carry out each action. The
framework, which could be used by clinicians to identify patterns that
facilitate or hinder recovery from adolescent depression, will be
presented. Research was funded by the Ohio Department of Mental Health, Grant. No.
02.1179
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInteraction Patterns of Adolescents with Depression and the Important Adults in the Livesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159332-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interaction Patterns of Adolescents with Depression and the Important Adults in the Lives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Draucker, Claire, PhD, RN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44236, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8805</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cdraucke@kent.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The one-year prevalence of Major Depressive Disorder in adolescents is <br/> thought to be as high as 8%, and yet few depressed adolescents receive <br/> specialty mental health services. Relationships among depressed <br/> adolescents and important adults in their lives significantly influence <br/> the expression and course of the depression, including mental health <br/> service use, but no studies have provided an in-depth description of these <br/> relationships. The purpose of this study is to describe common interaction <br/> patterns of adolescents who are depressed and important adults in their <br/> lives, with special attention given to interactions that influence the <br/> trajectory of the depression and service use. Data are drawn from a <br/> grounded theory study of the adolescent depression. Open-ended interviews <br/> were conducted with 52 community-dwelling young adults between the ages of <br/> 18 and 21 who experienced depressive symptoms as adolescents, four of <br/> their parents, and eight professionals who work with depressed youth. <br/> Participants were asked about their experiences with, or responses to, <br/> adolescent depression. For this study, narrative data regarding <br/> adolescent/adult relationships were examined. Constant comparison methods <br/> were used to develop a theoretical framework. All participants discussed <br/> how both adolescents and important adults ignore, hide or minimize the <br/> adolescents' distress by acting &quot;as if&quot; things are fine; that is, they <br/> create a facade of normality. The concept of the facade is the central <br/> construct in the framework, which is comprised of the following elements: <br/> (a) three common interaction patterns (maintaining the facade, poking <br/> holes in the facade, breaking down the facade), (b) several adult and <br/> adolescent actions that constitute each pattern, and (c) two adult and <br/> adolescent strategies frequently used to carry out each action. The <br/> framework, which could be used by clinicians to identify patterns that <br/> facilitate or hinder recovery from adolescent depression, will be <br/> presented. Research was funded by the Ohio Department of Mental Health, Grant. No. <br/> 02.1179</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:55:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:55:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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