2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159334
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychometric Evaluation of the Nonverbal Pain Assessment Tool (NPAT)
Abstract:
Psychometric Evaluation of the Nonverbal Pain Assessment Tool (NPAT)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Dumpe, Michelle, PhD, MS, RN - Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Title:Director
Contact Address:Division of Nursing, 9500 Euclid Avenue/P32, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA
Contact Telephone:2164457022
Co-Authors:Linda J. Lewicki, PhD, MSN, RN, Clinical Nurse Researcher and Deborah Klein, MSN, RN, CCRN
Significance. The sensation of pain is a subjective experience and
patients take an active role in pain assessment by verbalizing their level
of pain. However, due to illness or medical treatment, some patients are
unable to verbalize pain and rely on nurses to perform an adequate pain
assessment. Presently, a valid pain assessment tool for the nonverbal
patient does not exist. Guided by pediatric and general pain assessment
literature and staff nurse experience, a tool was developed and examined
to determine its validity and reliability in the intensive care patient
population. The NPAT incorporates five observational subscales of
behavioral indicators for pain: emotion, movement, verbal cues, facial
cues and positioning/guarding. Objective. The research objectives were: (1) Assess clinical application
of the NPAT, (2) Determine the validity of the NPAT, and (3) Determine the
reliability of the NPAT. Method. Teams of two nurses from five adult intensive care units were
trained on use of the NPAT. The teams collected data independently in two
phases. Phase one gathered paired but independent observations to examine
inter-rater reliability. Phase two examined criterion validity by engaging
communicative ICU patients and using the VAS scale. Results. 68 nonverbal patients were assessed. Patients in the MICU, due to
sedation protocols, were dropped from the study as it was determined the
NPAT was not clinically relevant. Interrater reliability was .69
(concordance correlation coefficient). 71 verbal patients were
independently assessed via the NPAT and VAS. Validity was .31. The tool
was revised based on input from staff. Repeat examination found
inter-rater reliability of .72 and validity .21. Implications. The NPAT is presently undergoing revision based on content
validity analysis. However, published research ( Puntillo, et al, 2004)
confirms the NPAT observable behaviors indicate pain. Scoring the behaviors requires further examination.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychometric Evaluation of the Nonverbal Pain Assessment Tool (NPAT)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159334-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychometric Evaluation of the Nonverbal Pain Assessment Tool (NPAT)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dumpe, Michelle, PhD, MS, RN - Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cleveland Clinic Foundation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Division of Nursing, 9500 Euclid Avenue/P32, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">2164457022</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dumpem@ccf.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda J. Lewicki, PhD, MSN, RN, Clinical Nurse Researcher and Deborah Klein, MSN, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Significance. The sensation of pain is a subjective experience and <br/> patients take an active role in pain assessment by verbalizing their level <br/> of pain. However, due to illness or medical treatment, some patients are <br/> unable to verbalize pain and rely on nurses to perform an adequate pain <br/> assessment. Presently, a valid pain assessment tool for the nonverbal <br/> patient does not exist. Guided by pediatric and general pain assessment <br/> literature and staff nurse experience, a tool was developed and examined <br/> to determine its validity and reliability in the intensive care patient <br/> population. The NPAT incorporates five observational subscales of <br/> behavioral indicators for pain: emotion, movement, verbal cues, facial <br/> cues and positioning/guarding. Objective. The research objectives were: (1) Assess clinical application <br/> of the NPAT, (2) Determine the validity of the NPAT, and (3) Determine the <br/> reliability of the NPAT. Method. Teams of two nurses from five adult intensive care units were <br/> trained on use of the NPAT. The teams collected data independently in two <br/> phases. Phase one gathered paired but independent observations to examine <br/> inter-rater reliability. Phase two examined criterion validity by engaging <br/> communicative ICU patients and using the VAS scale. Results. 68 nonverbal patients were assessed. Patients in the MICU, due to <br/> sedation protocols, were dropped from the study as it was determined the <br/> NPAT was not clinically relevant. Interrater reliability was .69 <br/> (concordance correlation coefficient). 71 verbal patients were <br/> independently assessed via the NPAT and VAS. Validity was .31. The tool <br/> was revised based on input from staff. Repeat examination found <br/> inter-rater reliability of .72 and validity .21. Implications. The NPAT is presently undergoing revision based on content <br/> validity analysis. However, published research ( Puntillo, et al, 2004) <br/> confirms the NPAT observable behaviors indicate pain. Scoring the behaviors requires further examination.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:55:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:55:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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