Evaluation of Subjective Sleep for Breast Cancer Survivors Experiencing Hot Flashes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159337
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Subjective Sleep for Breast Cancer Survivors Experiencing Hot Flashes
Abstract:
Evaluation of Subjective Sleep for Breast Cancer Survivors Experiencing Hot Flashes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Elam, Julie
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:Nursing Research Division, 1111 Middle Drive NU 338, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317-278-6095
Co-Authors:Janet Carpenter, Associate Professor
Purpose: To report sleep problems from the self-reported parameters of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in breast cancer survivors (BCS) experiencing hot flashes. Framework: Adapted Lenz Model of Unpleasant Symptoms. Design: Baseline data from an intervention study. Subjects: 72 female BCS experiencing hot flashes at southeastern and mid-western comprehensive cancer centers during 2000-2004. Women were a mean age of 51 years, Caucasian (92%), married/partnered (76%), employed (75%), postmenopausal (69%), with a mean of 15 years education, and at least one concurrent medical problem (46%). Methods: Baseline demographics and PSQI-19 item self rated scale of sleep (sleep quality, latency, duration, efficiency, disturbance, medication use, dysfunction, global sleep scores) over the past month. Results: Results indicate sleep is problematic in BCS experiencing hot flashes. Based on PSQI results, 26% described "fairly bad to very bad" sleep (quality), 56% revealed sleep onset greater than 15 minutes (latency), 49% reported 7 hours or less of sleep per night (duration), 47% had sleep efficiency scores less then 85% (indicator of poor sleep), 53% reported at least one sleep disturbance per week, 24% were taking sleep medications, 51% reported daytime dysfunction at least once per week, 65% met or exceeded the standard cut-off score for sleep problems ( >=5) and 33% met or exceeded the higher cutoff ( >=8) which has been significantly related to fatigue. Mean PSQI global scores were 6.7 (SD=3.7) indicating poor sleep quality and high sleep disturbance. Conclusions: Although sleep disturbances have been reported in BCS, detailed analysis and reporting of PSQI parameters in this population has been limited. Findings suggest sleep disturbances are common in BCS experiencing untreated hot flashes. Further evaluation of sleep problems with objective measures is necessary to further validate sleep problems in BCS experiencing hot flashes. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Subjective Sleep for Breast Cancer Survivors Experiencing Hot Flashesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159337-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of Subjective Sleep for Breast Cancer Survivors Experiencing Hot Flashes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Elam, Julie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Research Division, 1111 Middle Drive NU 338, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317-278-6095</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jlelam@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janet Carpenter, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To report sleep problems from the self-reported parameters of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in breast cancer survivors (BCS) experiencing hot flashes. Framework: Adapted Lenz Model of Unpleasant Symptoms. Design: Baseline data from an intervention study. Subjects: 72 female BCS experiencing hot flashes at southeastern and mid-western comprehensive cancer centers during 2000-2004. Women were a mean age of 51 years, Caucasian (92%), married/partnered (76%), employed (75%), postmenopausal (69%), with a mean of 15 years education, and at least one concurrent medical problem (46%). Methods: Baseline demographics and PSQI-19 item self rated scale of sleep (sleep quality, latency, duration, efficiency, disturbance, medication use, dysfunction, global sleep scores) over the past month. Results: Results indicate sleep is problematic in BCS experiencing hot flashes. Based on PSQI results, 26% described &quot;fairly bad to very bad&quot; sleep (quality), 56% revealed sleep onset greater than 15 minutes (latency), 49% reported 7 hours or less of sleep per night (duration), 47% had sleep efficiency scores less then 85% (indicator of poor sleep), 53% reported at least one sleep disturbance per week, 24% were taking sleep medications, 51% reported daytime dysfunction at least once per week, 65% met or exceeded the standard cut-off score for sleep problems ( &gt;=5) and 33% met or exceeded the higher cutoff ( &gt;=8) which has been significantly related to fatigue. Mean PSQI global scores were 6.7 (SD=3.7) indicating poor sleep quality and high sleep disturbance. Conclusions: Although sleep disturbances have been reported in BCS, detailed analysis and reporting of PSQI parameters in this population has been limited. Findings suggest sleep disturbances are common in BCS experiencing untreated hot flashes. Further evaluation of sleep problems with objective measures is necessary to further validate sleep problems in BCS experiencing hot flashes. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:55:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:55:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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