Knowledge of Stroke Symptoms and Risk Factors: Variations by Residence, Age, and Gender

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159339
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge of Stroke Symptoms and Risk Factors: Variations by Residence, Age, and Gender
Abstract:
Knowledge of Stroke Symptoms and Risk Factors: Variations by Residence, Age, and Gender
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ennen, Kathleen, BSN, MS, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Lakeview College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 903 N. Logan Avenue, Danville, IL, 61832, USA
Contact Telephone:2174435238
Stroke remains the third leading cause of death in the United States.
Most Americans do not recognize the symptoms of stroke causing delay in
receiving emergency treatment. The purpose of this research was to assess
the knowledge of stroke symptoms and risk factors in a general public
sample. Secondarily, similarities and differences in stroke knowledge
between rural and urban groups were identified. The self-administered
Stroke Recognition Questionnaire (SRQ) directed at stroke knowledge
assessment was developed. This descriptive, correlational study used a
non-experimental quantitative design. A community-based sample of 400
rural and 400 urban residents was randomly selected from telephone
directories and stratified by residence zip code. Dillman's (2000)
Tailored Design Method for mail surveys was implemented. Response rate for
this mail survey was 566 (70.5%) returned completed questionnaires. The
final sample consisted of 328 (58%) males and 236 (42%) females, ranged in
age from 20 to 97 years, and was evenly split at 283 (50%) rural and urban
respondents. The stroke symptom knowledge in this sample is better than
that reported in other studies, while the knowledge of stroke risk factors
is somewhat better or comparable. The stroke symptom subscale revealed
higher scores for rural respondents and those less than 64 years of age.
The most frequently identified stroke symptoms were slurred speech,
numbness of one side of face, weakness of one side of body, and confusion.
The stroke risk factor knowledge subscale revealed no significant
differences in recognition by residence location and gender. Younger
respondents more often recognized hypertension, smoking cigarettes,
diabetes and alcohol use. The most frequently identified stroke risk
factors were hypertension, high blood cholesterol, smoking, and more than
20 pounds overweight. The translation of knowledge about stroke symptoms
into treatment needs attention to increase early intervention and
reduction of disability and mortality associated with stroke.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKnowledge of Stroke Symptoms and Risk Factors: Variations by Residence, Age, and Genderen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159339-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Knowledge of Stroke Symptoms and Risk Factors: Variations by Residence, Age, and Gender</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ennen, Kathleen, BSN, MS, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lakeview College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 903 N. Logan Avenue, Danville, IL, 61832, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">2174435238</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kaennen@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Stroke remains the third leading cause of death in the United States. <br/> Most Americans do not recognize the symptoms of stroke causing delay in <br/> receiving emergency treatment. The purpose of this research was to assess <br/> the knowledge of stroke symptoms and risk factors in a general public <br/> sample. Secondarily, similarities and differences in stroke knowledge <br/> between rural and urban groups were identified. The self-administered <br/> Stroke Recognition Questionnaire (SRQ) directed at stroke knowledge <br/> assessment was developed. This descriptive, correlational study used a <br/> non-experimental quantitative design. A community-based sample of 400 <br/> rural and 400 urban residents was randomly selected from telephone <br/> directories and stratified by residence zip code. Dillman's (2000) <br/> Tailored Design Method for mail surveys was implemented. Response rate for <br/> this mail survey was 566 (70.5%) returned completed questionnaires. The <br/> final sample consisted of 328 (58%) males and 236 (42%) females, ranged in <br/> age from 20 to 97 years, and was evenly split at 283 (50%) rural and urban <br/> respondents. The stroke symptom knowledge in this sample is better than <br/> that reported in other studies, while the knowledge of stroke risk factors <br/> is somewhat better or comparable. The stroke symptom subscale revealed <br/> higher scores for rural respondents and those less than 64 years of age. <br/> The most frequently identified stroke symptoms were slurred speech, <br/> numbness of one side of face, weakness of one side of body, and confusion. <br/> The stroke risk factor knowledge subscale revealed no significant <br/> differences in recognition by residence location and gender. Younger <br/> respondents more often recognized hypertension, smoking cigarettes, <br/> diabetes and alcohol use. The most frequently identified stroke risk <br/> factors were hypertension, high blood cholesterol, smoking, and more than <br/> 20 pounds overweight. The translation of knowledge about stroke symptoms <br/> into treatment needs attention to increase early intervention and <br/> reduction of disability and mortality associated with stroke.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:55:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:55:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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