2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159340
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preparing for Interdisciplinary Research: Challenges to Doctoral Education
Abstract:
Preparing for Interdisciplinary Research: Challenges to Doctoral Education
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Edwardson, Sandra
Contact Address:SON, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street, SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455-0342, USA
Nursing education has made great strides in establishing high-quality doctoral programs over the last three decades, and in building knowledge for the profession. Key phenomena of interest to the nursing profession and to the discipline have been well-defined, and increasingly, investigators are establishing programs of research which advance the state of our knowledge in critical areas. Further, in the last decade, considerable consensus has been achieved about what elements are critical for excellence in doctoral programs, especially those specifically oriented toward preparing individuals for productive research careers. However, those responsible for doctoral education in nursing now face a new challenge: how to prepare future generations of scientists to work effectively and creatively at the edges of disciplines - in truly innovative and transdisciplinary lines of inquiry. Doctoral programs are now challenged to go beyond requiring preparation in a "cognate" area or a minor, to help students develop the skills they will need to translate knowledge, accommodate differing and often competing scientific "world views" as well as necessary first-hand experience functioning in interdisciplinary teams. The challenges inherent in educating doctoral graduates for interdisciplinary research are significant. First, the issue of current faculty involvement in such work: how can professors lead where they themselves may not have yet gone? Second, given that doctoral programs in nursing are located in a wide range of scientific environments, how do faculty identify which interdisciplinary partnerships are more likely to support student learning, and ultimately, successful programs of research? Finally, how will nursing balance the strong tradition of building knowledge for the discipline with a commitment to building knowledge across disciplines and at the very boundaries of science? AN: MN030278
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreparing for Interdisciplinary Research: Challenges to Doctoral Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159340-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preparing for Interdisciplinary Research: Challenges to Doctoral Education </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Edwardson, Sandra</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street, SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455-0342, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing education has made great strides in establishing high-quality doctoral programs over the last three decades, and in building knowledge for the profession. Key phenomena of interest to the nursing profession and to the discipline have been well-defined, and increasingly, investigators are establishing programs of research which advance the state of our knowledge in critical areas. Further, in the last decade, considerable consensus has been achieved about what elements are critical for excellence in doctoral programs, especially those specifically oriented toward preparing individuals for productive research careers. However, those responsible for doctoral education in nursing now face a new challenge: how to prepare future generations of scientists to work effectively and creatively at the edges of disciplines - in truly innovative and transdisciplinary lines of inquiry. Doctoral programs are now challenged to go beyond requiring preparation in a &quot;cognate&quot; area or a minor, to help students develop the skills they will need to translate knowledge, accommodate differing and often competing scientific &quot;world views&quot; as well as necessary first-hand experience functioning in interdisciplinary teams. The challenges inherent in educating doctoral graduates for interdisciplinary research are significant. First, the issue of current faculty involvement in such work: how can professors lead where they themselves may not have yet gone? Second, given that doctoral programs in nursing are located in a wide range of scientific environments, how do faculty identify which interdisciplinary partnerships are more likely to support student learning, and ultimately, successful programs of research? Finally, how will nursing balance the strong tradition of building knowledge for the discipline with a commitment to building knowledge across disciplines and at the very boundaries of science? AN: MN030278</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:55:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:55:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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