2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159344
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Accessing Diverse Frail Community-Dwelling Women over Age 85
Abstract:
Accessing Diverse Frail Community-Dwelling Women over Age 85
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Felten, Beverly
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Contact Address:Cunningham Hall, Milwaukee, WI, 53211, USA
The cohort of women over age 85 is the fastest growing segment of the elderly population, and includes an increasing number of women of color. Diverse community-dwelling women over age 85 are often frail and vulnerable. As a result, they are hidden by families and community networks for their own protection and are not easily accessible. Older women are leery of allowing strangers in their homes for any reason, especially if the stranger comes asking questions. Diverse, older community-dwelling women are therefore frequently excluded from research, yet they have different aging experiences. Research in the homes of diverse, frail older women requires "approval" of the researcher by a deeply immersed gatekeeper network with strong, trusted bonds. The sample for this dissertation study consisted of nine diverse community-dwelling women over age 85, interviewed in their homes using an oral history method seeking life experiences related to resilience. The racial/ ethnic backgrounds of participants were Asian, Hispanic, American Indian, African American and Caucasian. The researcher, of Caucasian ethnicity, partnered with a multi-racial colleague deeply immersed in several community networks to access diverse older women that otherwise would have remained hidden. Gatekeeper relationships became a source of data in the life experiences of diverse frail older women, a major factor in finding and accessing this cohort. Issues are raised related to confidentiality, and redefining the role of gatekeepers in community-dwelling geriatric research. Future studies must engage networks early in the research process. Doing so will result in a gatekeeper network with a vested interest in the completion of the study as a worthy endeavor, a willingness to act as a safety filter and liaison for researchers to meet with diverse, frail older women in private places, and improved understanding of how to conduct culturally-acceptable community-based research with this population. AN: MN030072
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccessing Diverse Frail Community-Dwelling Women over Age 85en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159344-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Accessing Diverse Frail Community-Dwelling Women over Age 85</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Felten, Beverly</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Cunningham Hall, Milwaukee, WI, 53211, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The cohort of women over age 85 is the fastest growing segment of the elderly population, and includes an increasing number of women of color. Diverse community-dwelling women over age 85 are often frail and vulnerable. As a result, they are hidden by families and community networks for their own protection and are not easily accessible. Older women are leery of allowing strangers in their homes for any reason, especially if the stranger comes asking questions. Diverse, older community-dwelling women are therefore frequently excluded from research, yet they have different aging experiences. Research in the homes of diverse, frail older women requires &quot;approval&quot; of the researcher by a deeply immersed gatekeeper network with strong, trusted bonds. The sample for this dissertation study consisted of nine diverse community-dwelling women over age 85, interviewed in their homes using an oral history method seeking life experiences related to resilience. The racial/ ethnic backgrounds of participants were Asian, Hispanic, American Indian, African American and Caucasian. The researcher, of Caucasian ethnicity, partnered with a multi-racial colleague deeply immersed in several community networks to access diverse older women that otherwise would have remained hidden. Gatekeeper relationships became a source of data in the life experiences of diverse frail older women, a major factor in finding and accessing this cohort. Issues are raised related to confidentiality, and redefining the role of gatekeepers in community-dwelling geriatric research. Future studies must engage networks early in the research process. Doing so will result in a gatekeeper network with a vested interest in the completion of the study as a worthy endeavor, a willingness to act as a safety filter and liaison for researchers to meet with diverse, frail older women in private places, and improved understanding of how to conduct culturally-acceptable community-based research with this population. AN: MN030072 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:55:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:55:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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