2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159346
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nondrug Intervention for the Self-treatment of Pain: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
Nondrug Intervention for the Self-treatment of Pain: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Fouladbakhsh, Judith
Contact Address:Family, Community, Mental Health, 2464 N. Fairview Lane, Rochester Hills, MI, 48306, USA
Co-Authors:April Hazard Vallerand; Cheryl Riley-Doucet
This experimental study was designed to test an intervention aimed at educating older adults about the appropriate use of nondrug treatments for pain. The problem identified was based on data from the researchers’ previous study that indicated elderly residents of a rural community used significantly less nondrug treatments for the self-treatment of pain than participants under age 60. Relevance of the study: safe and appropriate use of nondrug treatments is necessary to prevent injury, as well as to maximize pain management. Framework: an educational framework was used to determine if a community-based educational intervention would alter self-treatment choices made by participants in the experimental group and whether this would affect pain level, symptom distress and perception of control of pain. Study sample: (n=52) method of recruitment was self-selection. Consisted of adults over 60 who called to register for an educational session after receiving a flyer that had been distributed in a rural Midwestern community. Methods: subjects participated in a 30 or 60-minute education program, and a follow up evaluation session two weeks later. Each educational session was randomized to either the experimental or control condition. Randomization continued until each group (control and experimental) had at least 25 participants. Both groups attended a 30-minute educational session on safe use of analgesics. The experimental group received an additional 30-minute session on nondrug self-treatment. Both groups were instructed to complete a daily log indicating pain level and self-treatment choices for a two-week period. Instruments: Demographic Data Questionnaire, Brief Pain Inventory, Symptom Distress Scale (modified), and Perceived Control Scale: completed at both the initial and two-week follow-up sessions. Daily Self-Treatment Log submitted after 2 weeks. Results: Subjects: 34 female, 18 male; mean age: 70. Data indicated a significantly greater decrease in current pain level (p=. 037), and symptom distress (p=. 027) in the experimental group. AN: MN030233
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNondrug Intervention for the Self-treatment of Pain: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159346-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nondrug Intervention for the Self-treatment of Pain: A Pilot Study </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fouladbakhsh, Judith</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Family, Community, Mental Health, 2464 N. Fairview Lane, Rochester Hills, MI, 48306, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">April Hazard Vallerand; Cheryl Riley-Doucet </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This experimental study was designed to test an intervention aimed at educating older adults about the appropriate use of nondrug treatments for pain. The problem identified was based on data from the researchers&rsquo; previous study that indicated elderly residents of a rural community used significantly less nondrug treatments for the self-treatment of pain than participants under age 60. Relevance of the study: safe and appropriate use of nondrug treatments is necessary to prevent injury, as well as to maximize pain management. Framework: an educational framework was used to determine if a community-based educational intervention would alter self-treatment choices made by participants in the experimental group and whether this would affect pain level, symptom distress and perception of control of pain. Study sample: (n=52) method of recruitment was self-selection. Consisted of adults over 60 who called to register for an educational session after receiving a flyer that had been distributed in a rural Midwestern community. Methods: subjects participated in a 30 or 60-minute education program, and a follow up evaluation session two weeks later. Each educational session was randomized to either the experimental or control condition. Randomization continued until each group (control and experimental) had at least 25 participants. Both groups attended a 30-minute educational session on safe use of analgesics. The experimental group received an additional 30-minute session on nondrug self-treatment. Both groups were instructed to complete a daily log indicating pain level and self-treatment choices for a two-week period. Instruments: Demographic Data Questionnaire, Brief Pain Inventory, Symptom Distress Scale (modified), and Perceived Control Scale: completed at both the initial and two-week follow-up sessions. Daily Self-Treatment Log submitted after 2 weeks. Results: Subjects: 34 female, 18 male; mean age: 70. Data indicated a significantly greater decrease in current pain level (p=. 037), and symptom distress (p=. 027) in the experimental group. AN: MN030233</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:55:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:55:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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