Factors Related to Undergraduates' Preference for Physically Restraining or Using Alternatives with Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159348
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Related to Undergraduates' Preference for Physically Restraining or Using Alternatives with Older Adults
Abstract:
Factors Related to Undergraduates' Preference for Physically Restraining or Using Alternatives with Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Freeman, Florida
Contact Address:CON, 290 N Springfield Ave, Joliet, IL, 60435, USA
Progress in reducing the use of physical restraints with older adults is "halting" (Williams and Finch, 1997, p. 774). Alternatives to restraints may not be used due to educational deficits and anti-aging attitudes that undergraduate nursing education programs need to address. Senior nursing students (N=117) from four undergraduate programs completed Palmore's Facts on Aging Quiz1 (Palmore, 1998) and the Restraint Study Questionnaire Scherer et al., 1991; Matthiesen et al., 1996), both with extant published psychometric data. Investigator-developed vignettes, with a 1.00 content validity index, were used to assess participants' attitudes toward alternatives. Depending on normality and scaling considerations, parametric and nonparametric statistics, with post hoc comparisons, were conducted. Consistent with the Theory of Reasoned Action, knowledge of older adults and attitudes toward older adults were significantly related (r=0.283; p=0.002). Students' knowledge about older adults was low (Mean=55.9; SD 9.7) and their attitudes toward older adults were quite negative (-18.2; SD 19.2). Knowledge about older adults (r=0.20; p=0.031) and students' attitudes toward older adults (r=0.196; p=0.034) were significantly related to students' preference for using alternatives rather than physical restraints. "Transformative learning and emancipatory education strategies" (Mezirow, 1990, p. 354) may reverse anti-aging attitudes and promote transfer to workplace behaviors. Responding to technological patient care and instructional advances, nurse educators have fewer mechanisms for influencing students' values and attitudes. Information about older adults - re-integrated back into the curriculum - and gerontologic faculty are scarce. Longitudinal research will clarify education's impact on care of older adults in practice; intervention research will identify means for achieving pro-aging attitudes and social action skills in undergraduate nursing students. AN: MN030168
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Related to Undergraduates' Preference for Physically Restraining or Using Alternatives with Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159348-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Related to Undergraduates' Preference for Physically Restraining or Using Alternatives with Older Adults </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Freeman, Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 290 N Springfield Ave, Joliet, IL, 60435, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Progress in reducing the use of physical restraints with older adults is &quot;halting&quot; (Williams and Finch, 1997, p. 774). Alternatives to restraints may not be used due to educational deficits and anti-aging attitudes that undergraduate nursing education programs need to address. Senior nursing students (N=117) from four undergraduate programs completed Palmore's Facts on Aging Quiz1 (Palmore, 1998) and the Restraint Study Questionnaire Scherer et al., 1991; Matthiesen et al., 1996), both with extant published psychometric data. Investigator-developed vignettes, with a 1.00 content validity index, were used to assess participants' attitudes toward alternatives. Depending on normality and scaling considerations, parametric and nonparametric statistics, with post hoc comparisons, were conducted. Consistent with the Theory of Reasoned Action, knowledge of older adults and attitudes toward older adults were significantly related (r=0.283; p=0.002). Students' knowledge about older adults was low (Mean=55.9; SD 9.7) and their attitudes toward older adults were quite negative (-18.2; SD 19.2). Knowledge about older adults (r=0.20; p=0.031) and students' attitudes toward older adults (r=0.196; p=0.034) were significantly related to students' preference for using alternatives rather than physical restraints. &quot;Transformative learning and emancipatory education strategies&quot; (Mezirow, 1990, p. 354) may reverse anti-aging attitudes and promote transfer to workplace behaviors. Responding to technological patient care and instructional advances, nurse educators have fewer mechanisms for influencing students' values and attitudes. Information about older adults - re-integrated back into the curriculum - and gerontologic faculty are scarce. Longitudinal research will clarify education's impact on care of older adults in practice; intervention research will identify means for achieving pro-aging attitudes and social action skills in undergraduate nursing students. AN: MN030168 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:55:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:55:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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