Studying Parent Training in Low-Income Urban Communities: Lessons Learned in the Development of Participant-Centered Research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159349
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Studying Parent Training in Low-Income Urban Communities: Lessons Learned in the Development of Participant-Centered Research
Abstract:
Studying Parent Training in Low-Income Urban Communities: Lessons Learned in the Development of Participant-Centered Research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Garvey, Christine
Contact Address:CON, 600 S. Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Deborah Gross; Wrenetha Julion; Lou Fogg
The public is growing increasingly reticent to enroll in clinical trials. This problem is particularly acute in low-income neighborhoods and in ethnic minority communities where mistrust of research has long simmered. Because low participation rates in clinical trials threatens the validity of the research, effective strategies for increasing participation and retention are needed. Since 1995, we have been studying the effectiveness of parent training in 11 day care centers serving low-income families of color in Chicago. Over the course of this project, we have learned a number of important lessons regarding (1) the social validity of selected interventions with families of color, (2) the difficulties of using random assignment when people want choice, (3) the importance of developing relationships with gatekeepers in data collection sites, (4) factors that motivate parents to participate in parent training studies, (5) factors that cause parents to drop out of parent training studies, and (6) the complexities of selecting outcome measures that are both theoretically relevant and socially acceptable to participants. This presentation will describe these methodological issues when conducting a clinical trial in the community and the strategies we have developed for addressing them. Strategies include developing a consumer advisory board of parents, hiring data collectors from the community, paying data collectors by the hour rather than by the recruited participant, conducting exit interviews with parents who drop out, and developing random assignment techniques that allow everyone to receive intervention should they choose it. AN: MN030336
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudying Parent Training in Low-Income Urban Communities: Lessons Learned in the Development of Participant-Centered Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159349-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Studying Parent Training in Low-Income Urban Communities: Lessons Learned in the Development of Participant-Centered Research </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garvey, Christine</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 600 S. Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah Gross; Wrenetha Julion; Lou Fogg </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The public is growing increasingly reticent to enroll in clinical trials. This problem is particularly acute in low-income neighborhoods and in ethnic minority communities where mistrust of research has long simmered. Because low participation rates in clinical trials threatens the validity of the research, effective strategies for increasing participation and retention are needed. Since 1995, we have been studying the effectiveness of parent training in 11 day care centers serving low-income families of color in Chicago. Over the course of this project, we have learned a number of important lessons regarding (1) the social validity of selected interventions with families of color, (2) the difficulties of using random assignment when people want choice, (3) the importance of developing relationships with gatekeepers in data collection sites, (4) factors that motivate parents to participate in parent training studies, (5) factors that cause parents to drop out of parent training studies, and (6) the complexities of selecting outcome measures that are both theoretically relevant and socially acceptable to participants. This presentation will describe these methodological issues when conducting a clinical trial in the community and the strategies we have developed for addressing them. Strategies include developing a consumer advisory board of parents, hiring data collectors from the community, paying data collectors by the hour rather than by the recruited participant, conducting exit interviews with parents who drop out, and developing random assignment techniques that allow everyone to receive intervention should they choose it. AN: MN030336 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:55:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:55:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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