Where Do Men Get Information about Benign Prostatic Hyperlasia (Bph): Is There a Difference between College Educated and Non-College Educated Older Men?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159352
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Where Do Men Get Information about Benign Prostatic Hyperlasia (Bph): Is There a Difference between College Educated and Non-College Educated Older Men?
Abstract:
Where Do Men Get Information about Benign Prostatic Hyperlasia (Bph): Is There a Difference between College Educated and Non-College Educated Older Men?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Gladney, Evelyn
Contact Address:CON, A-211 Life Sciences, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Co-Authors:Vence L. Bonham; David R. Rovner; Celia E. Wills; Audrey G. Gift
Problem Statement: Prior research has shown that men are less likely to seek out healthcare information, which may result in them being less informed and able to make appropriate health care decisions. Purpose: To compare multimedia and person sources that college educated (CE) versus non-college educated (NCE) men used to obtain prostate information and people men indicated they would talk to if they had a prostate problem. Methods: A descriptive quasi-experimental design included 188 male participants. Mean age is 61 years (range 50 to 80 years old). 107 were college-educated (51 African American, 56 Caucasian) and 81 non-college-educated (37 African American, 44 Caucasian). General health questions from the BPH survey (conducted by trained male interviewers matched with participant’s race and approximate age) were used in the study. Results: College versus non-college educated men was compared on sources of information via chi-square analysis. Significantly more CE (64.4%) versus NCE men (39.2%) received information from printed materials; p=.001. CE (31.1%) versus NCE men (20.2%) were similar in getting information from radio/TV; p=.104). No difference for CE (14.4%) versus NCE men (4.1%) receiving information from the Internet; p=.066. Conclusion: Printed materials were the most frequently used source of health information, followed by TV/radio. Few men used the Internet as a source for prostate information. More CE men used printed material as a source of information than NCE men. With this information nurses can develop educational interventions tailored to the needs and choices of men with different socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds. AN: MN030052
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhere Do Men Get Information about Benign Prostatic Hyperlasia (Bph): Is There a Difference between College Educated and Non-College Educated Older Men?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159352-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Where Do Men Get Information about Benign Prostatic Hyperlasia (Bph): Is There a Difference between College Educated and Non-College Educated Older Men? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gladney, Evelyn</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, A-211 Life Sciences, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Vence L. Bonham; David R. Rovner; Celia E. Wills; Audrey G. Gift </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Statement: Prior research has shown that men are less likely to seek out healthcare information, which may result in them being less informed and able to make appropriate health care decisions. Purpose: To compare multimedia and person sources that college educated (CE) versus non-college educated (NCE) men used to obtain prostate information and people men indicated they would talk to if they had a prostate problem. Methods: A descriptive quasi-experimental design included 188 male participants. Mean age is 61 years (range 50 to 80 years old). 107 were college-educated (51 African American, 56 Caucasian) and 81 non-college-educated (37 African American, 44 Caucasian). General health questions from the BPH survey (conducted by trained male interviewers matched with participant&rsquo;s race and approximate age) were used in the study. Results: College versus non-college educated men was compared on sources of information via chi-square analysis. Significantly more CE (64.4%) versus NCE men (39.2%) received information from printed materials; p=.001. CE (31.1%) versus NCE men (20.2%) were similar in getting information from radio/TV; p=.104). No difference for CE (14.4%) versus NCE men (4.1%) receiving information from the Internet; p=.066. Conclusion: Printed materials were the most frequently used source of health information, followed by TV/radio. Few men used the Internet as a source for prostate information. More CE men used printed material as a source of information than NCE men. With this information nurses can develop educational interventions tailored to the needs and choices of men with different socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds. AN: MN030052 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:56:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:56:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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