Student and faculty beliefs/attitudes about complementary therapies: Implications for nursing education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159353
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Student and faculty beliefs/attitudes about complementary therapies: Implications for nursing education
Abstract:
Student and faculty beliefs/attitudes about complementary therapies: Implications for nursing education
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Halcon, Linda
Contact Address:6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Co-Authors:Linda Chlan; Linda L. Chlan; Mary Jo Kreitzer; Barbara J. Leonard
: Purpose: To describe knowledge and attitudes of nursing faculty and students (BSN and graduate) regarding complementary/alternative therapies (C/AT) and their integration into nursing practice, identify differences among these groups, and recommend C/AT areas for curricular and faculty development. Subjects: Participants in this cross-sectional survey (N=204) included graduating BSN students (n=80), graduating MS and PhD students (n=48) and faculty (n=76) in a university-based nursing program. Methods: The self-administered questionnaire contained 134 forced choice items. Questions assessed attitudes and knowledge about C/AT education, personal use of C/AT, perceived practice barriers for nurses and nursing, and respondents' intent to integrate C/AT into their own clinical practice. Findings: Over 95% of students and faculty agreed that clinical care should integrate the best of conventional and C/AT practices. Few had received formal C/AT education (highest in massage, music, prayer/spiritual healing, therapeutic/healing touch). They desired more education but not necessarily the skills to perform complementary therapies themselves. The most important perceived barrier to incorporation of C/AT was lack of evidence, with a variety of types of evidence recognized as important. Less than half of students (35% of BSN students, 47% of graduate students) identified "Western biomedicine" as the primary worldview or health framework guiding their personal health views, compared to 79% of faculty. Conclusions: Faculty and students alike expressed positive attitudes about incorporating C/AT into curricula and nursing practice. Current knowledge lags behind interest, however, suggesting a situation that is ripe for change. Curricular change is needed to fully integrate C/AT knowledge and selected skills within nursing programs at all levels. Nursing research is needed to provide scientific and other evidence of efficacy. Faculty development is needed to facilitate curricular changes and promote research in this area. AN: MN030335
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudent and faculty beliefs/attitudes about complementary therapies: Implications for nursing educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159353-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Student and faculty beliefs/attitudes about complementary therapies: Implications for nursing education </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Halcon, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda Chlan; Linda L. Chlan; Mary Jo Kreitzer; Barbara J. Leonard </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">: Purpose: To describe knowledge and attitudes of nursing faculty and students (BSN and graduate) regarding complementary/alternative therapies (C/AT) and their integration into nursing practice, identify differences among these groups, and recommend C/AT areas for curricular and faculty development. Subjects: Participants in this cross-sectional survey (N=204) included graduating BSN students (n=80), graduating MS and PhD students (n=48) and faculty (n=76) in a university-based nursing program. Methods: The self-administered questionnaire contained 134 forced choice items. Questions assessed attitudes and knowledge about C/AT education, personal use of C/AT, perceived practice barriers for nurses and nursing, and respondents' intent to integrate C/AT into their own clinical practice. Findings: Over 95% of students and faculty agreed that clinical care should integrate the best of conventional and C/AT practices. Few had received formal C/AT education (highest in massage, music, prayer/spiritual healing, therapeutic/healing touch). They desired more education but not necessarily the skills to perform complementary therapies themselves. The most important perceived barrier to incorporation of C/AT was lack of evidence, with a variety of types of evidence recognized as important. Less than half of students (35% of BSN students, 47% of graduate students) identified &quot;Western biomedicine&quot; as the primary worldview or health framework guiding their personal health views, compared to 79% of faculty. Conclusions: Faculty and students alike expressed positive attitudes about incorporating C/AT into curricula and nursing practice. Current knowledge lags behind interest, however, suggesting a situation that is ripe for change. Curricular change is needed to fully integrate C/AT knowledge and selected skills within nursing programs at all levels. Nursing research is needed to provide scientific and other evidence of efficacy. Faculty development is needed to facilitate curricular changes and promote research in this area. AN: MN030335</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:56:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:56:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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