Exercise, Physical Activity, and Physical Performance in Thai Elders after Knee Replacement Surgery: a Behavioral Change Intervention Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159354
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exercise, Physical Activity, and Physical Performance in Thai Elders after Knee Replacement Surgery: a Behavioral Change Intervention Study
Abstract:
Exercise, Physical Activity, and Physical Performance in Thai Elders after Knee Replacement Surgery: a Behavioral Change Intervention Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Harnirattisai, Teeranut
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing, S316, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Co-Authors:Rebecca Johnson
Osteoarthritis is one of the major problems of older adults in Thailand (Sermsri, 1999). Arthritis and osteoarthritis commonly result in varying levels of disability. Disability is most common among Thai women of advanced age (Jitapunkul, Kunanusont, Poonchareon, & Suriyawongpisal, 1999). Total knee replacement is often the treatment of choice for osteoarthritis patients when conservative management fails to restore mobility and control pain (Maxey & Magnusson, 2001). Rehabilitation programs including exercise and physical activity subsequent to knee replacement surgery play a major role in returning the patients to functional independence (Goldstein, 1999). Changing physical activity and exercise behavior of older adults is important to improve physical performance in geriatric rehabilitation. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a behavioral change intervention on self-efficacy, outcome expectation, physical activity participation, and physical performance of older adults after knee replacement surgery. It uses a quasi-experimental design with a pre-posttest control group and a qualitative component. The experimental group receive a behavioral change intervention in addition to usual care given by hospital nursing staff. The behavioral change intervention designed based on the Social Cognitive Theory consists of nurse-patient interaction and discussion about exercise and physical activity, the patients recording their exercise and physical activity, information prompts, and family support of exercise and physical activity. This research is underway in two large hospitals in Thailand from July to December 2002. Subjects are 80 older adults (age 60 and older) and diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee requiring knee replacement surgery. Statistics used to test the efficacy of this intervention will be repeated measures multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA). The findings from this study will be used to develop nursing knowledge in changing physical activity and exercise behavior among older adults in geriatric rehabilitation in order to improve their physical performance. AN: MN030019
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExercise, Physical Activity, and Physical Performance in Thai Elders after Knee Replacement Surgery: a Behavioral Change Intervention Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159354-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exercise, Physical Activity, and Physical Performance in Thai Elders after Knee Replacement Surgery: a Behavioral Change Intervention Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harnirattisai, Teeranut</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing, S316, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rebecca Johnson</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Osteoarthritis is one of the major problems of older adults in Thailand (Sermsri, 1999). Arthritis and osteoarthritis commonly result in varying levels of disability. Disability is most common among Thai women of advanced age (Jitapunkul, Kunanusont, Poonchareon, &amp; Suriyawongpisal, 1999). Total knee replacement is often the treatment of choice for osteoarthritis patients when conservative management fails to restore mobility and control pain (Maxey &amp; Magnusson, 2001). Rehabilitation programs including exercise and physical activity subsequent to knee replacement surgery play a major role in returning the patients to functional independence (Goldstein, 1999). Changing physical activity and exercise behavior of older adults is important to improve physical performance in geriatric rehabilitation. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a behavioral change intervention on self-efficacy, outcome expectation, physical activity participation, and physical performance of older adults after knee replacement surgery. It uses a quasi-experimental design with a pre-posttest control group and a qualitative component. The experimental group receive a behavioral change intervention in addition to usual care given by hospital nursing staff. The behavioral change intervention designed based on the Social Cognitive Theory consists of nurse-patient interaction and discussion about exercise and physical activity, the patients recording their exercise and physical activity, information prompts, and family support of exercise and physical activity. This research is underway in two large hospitals in Thailand from July to December 2002. Subjects are 80 older adults (age 60 and older) and diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee requiring knee replacement surgery. Statistics used to test the efficacy of this intervention will be repeated measures multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA). The findings from this study will be used to develop nursing knowledge in changing physical activity and exercise behavior among older adults in geriatric rehabilitation in order to improve their physical performance. AN: MN030019 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:56:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:56:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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