Determination of Relationships among Patient Satisfaction, Pain Intensity and Expectations of Pain Management

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159358
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determination of Relationships among Patient Satisfaction, Pain Intensity and Expectations of Pain Management
Abstract:
Determination of Relationships among Patient Satisfaction, Pain Intensity and Expectations of Pain Management
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Herrick, Linda
Contact Address:Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA
Co-Authors:Anne G. Miers; Gayle Baird; Pamela Maxson; Barbara Snyder; Diane Wrobleski
Purpose: The purpose was to identify the relationships among patient satisfaction with pain management, overall satisfaction, pain intensity, and expectations related to pain management in patients undergoing neurological, colorectal, abdominal, and general surgeries. Better knowledge of these relationships is necessary if patient satisfaction with pain management is to be used as an outcome of pain management. Conceptual Framework: Earlier work has demonstrated little relationship between pain intensity and satisfaction with pain management or overall satisfaction. While satisfaction has been shown to be multi-factorial, the relationships between pain intensity and expectations related to pain management have had little attention in acute pain. Subjects: This study included 335 patients (173 males, 162 females), ranging in age from 19-92 years. Patients underwent neurological, colorectal, and general surgeries. Patients who were confused or comatose were excluded as were those who could not understand written English. Method: Patients were consented prior to this prospective medical record review and written survey. Data collected included demographics, type of and indication for surgery, admission medications, all pain-related interventions, pain intensities, and a satisfaction survey administered just prior to discharge. Results: Pain intensities ranged from 0-10 with means of 3-4. Satisfaction was high. Patients expected relatively high levels of pain. Factor analysis did not confirm previously identified subscales. Correlations between effects of pain and expectations were moderate while correlations between satisfaction questions and expectations were low. Moderate to high correlations (.35-.54) were found between satisfaction with caring and communication related to pain questions and satisfaction with pain management. Conclusions: Satisfaction with pain management may be a better indicator of the care environment and communication between patients and providers than an indicator of the quality of pain management. While it was hypothesized that the difference between expectations and experience might correlate with satisfaction, this was not the case. AN: MN030125
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDetermination of Relationships among Patient Satisfaction, Pain Intensity and Expectations of Pain Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159358-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determination of Relationships among Patient Satisfaction, Pain Intensity and Expectations of Pain Management </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Herrick, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anne G. Miers; Gayle Baird; Pamela Maxson; Barbara Snyder; Diane Wrobleski</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose was to identify the relationships among patient satisfaction with pain management, overall satisfaction, pain intensity, and expectations related to pain management in patients undergoing neurological, colorectal, abdominal, and general surgeries. Better knowledge of these relationships is necessary if patient satisfaction with pain management is to be used as an outcome of pain management. Conceptual Framework: Earlier work has demonstrated little relationship between pain intensity and satisfaction with pain management or overall satisfaction. While satisfaction has been shown to be multi-factorial, the relationships between pain intensity and expectations related to pain management have had little attention in acute pain. Subjects: This study included 335 patients (173 males, 162 females), ranging in age from 19-92 years. Patients underwent neurological, colorectal, and general surgeries. Patients who were confused or comatose were excluded as were those who could not understand written English. Method: Patients were consented prior to this prospective medical record review and written survey. Data collected included demographics, type of and indication for surgery, admission medications, all pain-related interventions, pain intensities, and a satisfaction survey administered just prior to discharge. Results: Pain intensities ranged from 0-10 with means of 3-4. Satisfaction was high. Patients expected relatively high levels of pain. Factor analysis did not confirm previously identified subscales. Correlations between effects of pain and expectations were moderate while correlations between satisfaction questions and expectations were low. Moderate to high correlations (.35-.54) were found between satisfaction with caring and communication related to pain questions and satisfaction with pain management. Conclusions: Satisfaction with pain management may be a better indicator of the care environment and communication between patients and providers than an indicator of the quality of pain management. While it was hypothesized that the difference between expectations and experience might correlate with satisfaction, this was not the case. AN: MN030125</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:56:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:56:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.