Using Actigraphy to Measure Sleep and Light in the Chronically Critically Ill Patient

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159359
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Actigraphy to Measure Sleep and Light in the Chronically Critically Ill Patient
Abstract:
Using Actigraphy to Measure Sleep and Light in the Chronically Critically Ill Patient
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Higgins, Patricia
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:Amy R. Lipson
It is commonly accepted that sleep is a precious commodity for hospitalized patients, and this is particularly true for those who are chronically critically ill. For these patients, sleep is disrupted by environmental factors [interventions, light and noise] and individual factors [severity of illness, medications and psychological stress]. Research to date has primarily used polysomnography to measure sleep-rest states in the critical care units. As the gold standard, polysomnography is valid and reliable, but also intrusive and costly; thus, there are few studies and most include small numbers of patients. This pilot study reports the development of a protocol to measure the sleep-rest state of medical-surgical ICU patients using a wrist monitor, the Sleep Watch-L® [Ambulatory Monitoring Inc]. The monitor measures movement as an estimation of sleep-rest (actigraphy) and ambient room light. Because there are no known studies that used this type of technology in the ICU patient population, the study reported here provides a protocol for applying the wrist monitors and system and patient-related issues that challenge data collection. Issues with data analysis and interpretation also are discussed. All subjects were enrolled in a larger study investigating factors associated with adult failure to thrive syndrome in long-term [> 3 days] ventilator patients who were weaning [NINR NR-05005]. Each patient was monitored for a 24-hour period on a weekly basis for the duration of their hospitalization. Data from 20 patients are included. Statistical analysis presents variation in light intensity, mean number of sleep episodes/24 hours, percent sleep/24 hours. Graphical analysis illustrates the 4-channel monitoring system, circadian variations of sleep and light; and changes during hospitalization. AN: MN030372
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Actigraphy to Measure Sleep and Light in the Chronically Critically Ill Patienten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159359-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Actigraphy to Measure Sleep and Light in the Chronically Critically Ill Patient </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Higgins, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Amy R. Lipson</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">It is commonly accepted that sleep is a precious commodity for hospitalized patients, and this is particularly true for those who are chronically critically ill. For these patients, sleep is disrupted by environmental factors [interventions, light and noise] and individual factors [severity of illness, medications and psychological stress]. Research to date has primarily used polysomnography to measure sleep-rest states in the critical care units. As the gold standard, polysomnography is valid and reliable, but also intrusive and costly; thus, there are few studies and most include small numbers of patients. This pilot study reports the development of a protocol to measure the sleep-rest state of medical-surgical ICU patients using a wrist monitor, the Sleep Watch-L&reg; [Ambulatory Monitoring Inc]. The monitor measures movement as an estimation of sleep-rest (actigraphy) and ambient room light. Because there are no known studies that used this type of technology in the ICU patient population, the study reported here provides a protocol for applying the wrist monitors and system and patient-related issues that challenge data collection. Issues with data analysis and interpretation also are discussed. All subjects were enrolled in a larger study investigating factors associated with adult failure to thrive syndrome in long-term [&gt; 3 days] ventilator patients who were weaning [NINR NR-05005]. Each patient was monitored for a 24-hour period on a weekly basis for the duration of their hospitalization. Data from 20 patients are included. Statistical analysis presents variation in light intensity, mean number of sleep episodes/24 hours, percent sleep/24 hours. Graphical analysis illustrates the 4-channel monitoring system, circadian variations of sleep and light; and changes during hospitalization. AN: MN030372 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:56:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:56:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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