2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159361
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Subclinical Coronary Artery Disease in Women: Is Exercise Protective?
Abstract:
Subclinical Coronary Artery Disease in Women: Is Exercise Protective?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Hoff, Anne
Contact Address:Medical Surgical Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue (m/c 802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Alexander Sevrukov; Heather Gray; Barbara Martinez; Eva Chomka; Martha Daviglus; George Kondos
Background: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that exercise is associated with a decrease in coronary artery disease (CAD) risk, yet data on women is limited. We sought to examine the association between self-reported exercise activity and subclinical CAD as measured by Electron Beam Tomography (EBT) coronary artery calcium (CAC), in a cohort of women without known CAD. Methods: Between 1993 and 1997, 6,016 women between the ages of 30 and 75 years self-referred for EBT CAC screening. Demographics, physical activity, and other CAD risk factors (cigarette use, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension) were recorded by questionnaire. Physical activity was classified as none or moderate to vigorous. EBT scans were obtained with 100-msec scanning time and 3-mm scan width using a C-100 scanner. CAC was measured using the Agatston method. Results: Moderate to vigorous exercise (at least 3 times per week for at least 30 minutes) was reported by 933 (16%) women. The prevalence of CAD risk factors did not differ by physical activity group. However, women who exercised at any intensity level compared to sedentary women were younger (53±8 vs. 54±9 years, P=0.02), had a lower BMI (25±5 vs. 27±9 years, P<0.001) and had a significantly lower prevalence of measurable CAC (40% vs. 49%, P<0.001). Controlling for age, BMI, and other CAD risk factors, logistic regression demonstrated that the likelihood of an active woman having CAC was 20% less than a sedentary woman (OR=0.8; 95%CI=0.7-0.9, P=0.002). Conclusions: These data illustrate that women who exercise with moderate to vigorous intensity have lower prevalence of subclinical CAD as measured by EBT compared to sedentary women. Exercise appears to have a protective effect against the development of CAC, however, other unaccounted elements of a healthy lifestyle may also contribute to this favorable outcome. AN: MN030337
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSubclinical Coronary Artery Disease in Women: Is Exercise Protective?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159361-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Subclinical Coronary Artery Disease in Women: Is Exercise Protective? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hoff, Anne</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical Surgical Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue (m/c 802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Alexander Sevrukov; Heather Gray; Barbara Martinez; Eva Chomka; Martha Daviglus; George Kondos </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that exercise is associated with a decrease in coronary artery disease (CAD) risk, yet data on women is limited. We sought to examine the association between self-reported exercise activity and subclinical CAD as measured by Electron Beam Tomography (EBT) coronary artery calcium (CAC), in a cohort of women without known CAD. Methods: Between 1993 and 1997, 6,016 women between the ages of 30 and 75 years self-referred for EBT CAC screening. Demographics, physical activity, and other CAD risk factors (cigarette use, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension) were recorded by questionnaire. Physical activity was classified as none or moderate to vigorous. EBT scans were obtained with 100-msec scanning time and 3-mm scan width using a C-100 scanner. CAC was measured using the Agatston method. Results: Moderate to vigorous exercise (at least 3 times per week for at least 30 minutes) was reported by 933 (16%) women. The prevalence of CAD risk factors did not differ by physical activity group. However, women who exercised at any intensity level compared to sedentary women were younger (53&plusmn;8 vs. 54&plusmn;9 years, P=0.02), had a lower BMI (25&plusmn;5 vs. 27&plusmn;9 years, P&lt;0.001) and had a significantly lower prevalence of measurable CAC (40% vs. 49%, P&lt;0.001). Controlling for age, BMI, and other CAD risk factors, logistic regression demonstrated that the likelihood of an active woman having CAC was 20% less than a sedentary woman (OR=0.8; 95%CI=0.7-0.9, P=0.002). Conclusions: These data illustrate that women who exercise with moderate to vigorous intensity have lower prevalence of subclinical CAD as measured by EBT compared to sedentary women. Exercise appears to have a protective effect against the development of CAC, however, other unaccounted elements of a healthy lifestyle may also contribute to this favorable outcome. AN: MN030337 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:56:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:56:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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