Maternal Spirituality, Stress, and Health Risk Behaviors in a Group of Women from Appalachia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159363
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Spirituality, Stress, and Health Risk Behaviors in a Group of Women from Appalachia
Abstract:
Maternal Spirituality, Stress, and Health Risk Behaviors in a Group of Women from Appalachia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Jesse, D.
Contact Address:SON, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
The purpose of this prospective study was to examine the relationships of spirituality and psychosocial well-being to each other and to health risk behaviors in pregnancy among women from Appalachia. The variables of interest in this particular study address two domains in the HOPE Theory, which proposes that harmony of the physical, emotional, and spiritual domains are important to perinatal health and that each is a reflection of the whole. Within the HOPE theory, spirituality is described broadly as an honoring of a sense of presence that is higher or greater than the individual human being and includes both religiosity and ones spiritual perspective. Psychosocial well-being is defined as level of emotional stress, satisfaction with social support from partner and others, and self-esteem. The study sample consisted of 120 women between 16-28 weeks of pregnancy recruited from a private practice and two public prenatal clinics in central Appalachia. Participants completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS), 4-items from the Jarel Well-Being Scale, the Prenatal Psychosocial Profile (PPP), and 4-items measuring health risk behaviors. Multiple and logistic regression analysis found that higher spiritual perspective scores were significantly related to a lower incidence of smoking and stress was the only item significantly related to substance use in pregnancy when all other variables in the model were held constant. Thus the results of this study support the importance of integrating spiritual resources and stress reduction activities during pregnancy to improve health promotion efforts with women from Appalachia. Implications for nursing research and practice will be discussed. AN: MN030217
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Spirituality, Stress, and Health Risk Behaviors in a Group of Women from Appalachiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159363-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Spirituality, Stress, and Health Risk Behaviors in a Group of Women from Appalachia </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jesse, D.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this prospective study was to examine the relationships of spirituality and psychosocial well-being to each other and to health risk behaviors in pregnancy among women from Appalachia. The variables of interest in this particular study address two domains in the HOPE Theory, which proposes that harmony of the physical, emotional, and spiritual domains are important to perinatal health and that each is a reflection of the whole. Within the HOPE theory, spirituality is described broadly as an honoring of a sense of presence that is higher or greater than the individual human being and includes both religiosity and ones spiritual perspective. Psychosocial well-being is defined as level of emotional stress, satisfaction with social support from partner and others, and self-esteem. The study sample consisted of 120 women between 16-28 weeks of pregnancy recruited from a private practice and two public prenatal clinics in central Appalachia. Participants completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS), 4-items from the Jarel Well-Being Scale, the Prenatal Psychosocial Profile (PPP), and 4-items measuring health risk behaviors. Multiple and logistic regression analysis found that higher spiritual perspective scores were significantly related to a lower incidence of smoking and stress was the only item significantly related to substance use in pregnancy when all other variables in the model were held constant. Thus the results of this study support the importance of integrating spiritual resources and stress reduction activities during pregnancy to improve health promotion efforts with women from Appalachia. Implications for nursing research and practice will be discussed. AN: MN030217 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:56:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:56:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.