Animal Assisted Activity and Anxiety Among Radiation Therapy Patients: The “Hand & Paw Study”

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159364
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Animal Assisted Activity and Anxiety Among Radiation Therapy Patients: The “Hand & Paw Study”
Abstract:
Animal Assisted Activity and Anxiety Among Radiation Therapy Patients: The “Hand & Paw Study”
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Johnson, Rebecca
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Co-Authors:Richard L. Meadows; Kathy Sevedge; Jennifer S. Haubner
Purpose: The study aimed to ascertain the extent to which an animal activity (visit with a dog) affects anxiety, mood, self-perceived health, and sense of coherence among cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Sample & Design: A longitudinal, quantitative design was used with a convenience sample of 30 English speaking/English literate adult patients who had no known pet allergies and were receiving radiation therapy for a period of at least 4 weeks following diagnosis of Stage 2 or 3 cancer. Those receiving radiation therapy for metastases were excluded. Method: Patients randomly assigned to the experimental group receive fifteen minute sessions three times weekly for 4 weeks with one of two visitor dogs and their handlers (n=10). Those randomly assigned to the human control group received a friendly visit with an adult for fifteen minutes, three times weekly for 4 weeks (n=10). Those randomly assigned to the silent reading group were asked to read some material provided for fifteen minutes, three times weekly for 4 weeks (n=10). Mood, anxiety (assessed via the Profile of Mood States), sense of coherence (assessed via the Orientation to Life Questionnaire), fatigue and self-perceived health were assessed at two points: before receiving any animal activity, friendly visits, or quiet reading, and at the clinic session following the 4 week study/control interventions (5th week). Following their first dog/friendly visit or reading session and at the 5th week, perceived benefit of the visits or reading were assessed (Intervention Questionnaire). Data analysis involved using multiple regression techniques and analysis of variance to ascertain changes in the dependent variables over time. Findings: Patients indicated that the dog visits helped to distract them from their disease and treatment, and assisted them to feel “normal.” They looked forward to the visits and thought about their dog visitor after they left the hospital. AN: MN030083
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnimal Assisted Activity and Anxiety Among Radiation Therapy Patients: The “Hand & Paw Study”en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159364-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Animal Assisted Activity and Anxiety Among Radiation Therapy Patients: The &ldquo;Hand &amp; Paw Study&rdquo; </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Rebecca</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Richard L. Meadows; Kathy Sevedge; Jennifer S. Haubner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The study aimed to ascertain the extent to which an animal activity (visit with a dog) affects anxiety, mood, self-perceived health, and sense of coherence among cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Sample &amp; Design: A longitudinal, quantitative design was used with a convenience sample of 30 English speaking/English literate adult patients who had no known pet allergies and were receiving radiation therapy for a period of at least 4 weeks following diagnosis of Stage 2 or 3 cancer. Those receiving radiation therapy for metastases were excluded. Method: Patients randomly assigned to the experimental group receive fifteen minute sessions three times weekly for 4 weeks with one of two visitor dogs and their handlers (n=10). Those randomly assigned to the human control group received a friendly visit with an adult for fifteen minutes, three times weekly for 4 weeks (n=10). Those randomly assigned to the silent reading group were asked to read some material provided for fifteen minutes, three times weekly for 4 weeks (n=10). Mood, anxiety (assessed via the Profile of Mood States), sense of coherence (assessed via the Orientation to Life Questionnaire), fatigue and self-perceived health were assessed at two points: before receiving any animal activity, friendly visits, or quiet reading, and at the clinic session following the 4 week study/control interventions (5th week). Following their first dog/friendly visit or reading session and at the 5th week, perceived benefit of the visits or reading were assessed (Intervention Questionnaire). Data analysis involved using multiple regression techniques and analysis of variance to ascertain changes in the dependent variables over time. Findings: Patients indicated that the dog visits helped to distract them from their disease and treatment, and assisted them to feel &ldquo;normal.&rdquo; They looked forward to the visits and thought about their dog visitor after they left the hospital. AN: MN030083 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:56:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:56:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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