Validity of self reported health conditions of clients with serious mental illnesses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159367
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validity of self reported health conditions of clients with serious mental illnesses
Abstract:
Validity of self reported health conditions of clients with serious mental illnesses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Kennedy, Carol
Contact Address:CON, 1585 Neil Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Co-Authors:Pamela Salsberry
Previous research suggests that people with serious psychiatric disorders may not be able to provide a reliable self-report of health because of compromised cognitive function and lack of insight associated with their illness. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether individuals with serious and persistent mental illnesses could provide reliable reports of their health and health conditions. Interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 109 clients from five community mental health agencies in the Midwest. As part of the interview, clients were asked if they had ever been told by a health provider that they had any of 16 chronic conditions. Client responses were compared with diagnoses and other health indicators recorded in their mental health agency chart. Percent of agreement ranged from 99% with HIV/AIDS and cancer to 72.5% for arthritis indicating that reliability of self reported health conditions was generally high. To further validate these findings, client reports and chart notations of illness in six categories were also compared with administrative claims data. The results of this analysis revealed that, in general, there was a high degree of congruence among the three sources of data with a high of 95% agreement with cancer to 68% agreement with cardiovascular and hypertension. These data suggest that clients with severe mental illnesses are not exaggerating their physical problems, and in fact, they are fairly accurately reporting correct health problems when asked. If clients are erring, it is in the direction of not bringing health problems to the clinician’s attention. A question raised by this method of analysis is “What is the gold standard for the source of a persons health state?” In this case, the data suggest that the client, the provider and payee share a high degree of congruence which should allow providers to view clients as credible sources of health information. AN: MN030378
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidity of self reported health conditions of clients with serious mental illnessesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159367-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Validity of self reported health conditions of clients with serious mental illnesses </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kennedy, Carol</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 1585 Neil Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Pamela Salsberry </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Previous research suggests that people with serious psychiatric disorders may not be able to provide a reliable self-report of health because of compromised cognitive function and lack of insight associated with their illness. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether individuals with serious and persistent mental illnesses could provide reliable reports of their health and health conditions. Interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 109 clients from five community mental health agencies in the Midwest. As part of the interview, clients were asked if they had ever been told by a health provider that they had any of 16 chronic conditions. Client responses were compared with diagnoses and other health indicators recorded in their mental health agency chart. Percent of agreement ranged from 99% with HIV/AIDS and cancer to 72.5% for arthritis indicating that reliability of self reported health conditions was generally high. To further validate these findings, client reports and chart notations of illness in six categories were also compared with administrative claims data. The results of this analysis revealed that, in general, there was a high degree of congruence among the three sources of data with a high of 95% agreement with cancer to 68% agreement with cardiovascular and hypertension. These data suggest that clients with severe mental illnesses are not exaggerating their physical problems, and in fact, they are fairly accurately reporting correct health problems when asked. If clients are erring, it is in the direction of not bringing health problems to the clinician&rsquo;s attention. A question raised by this method of analysis is &ldquo;What is the gold standard for the source of a persons health state?&rdquo; In this case, the data suggest that the client, the provider and payee share a high degree of congruence which should allow providers to view clients as credible sources of health information. AN: MN030378 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:56:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:56:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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