Do Women Want to Know Their Breast Cancer Risk?: Description of Need and Utility of a Risk Assessment Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159372
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Women Want to Know Their Breast Cancer Risk?: Description of Need and Utility of a Risk Assessment Program
Abstract:
Do Women Want to Know Their Breast Cancer Risk?: Description of Need and Utility of a Risk Assessment Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Lally, Robin
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3800 Park Nicollet Blvd, Oncology Research, Suite 2S, Minneapolis, MN, 55416, USA
Co-Authors:Heather C. Kehn; Jeanne Harkness
Most women either overestimate or underestimate their risk of developing breast cancer. The self-regulation model of illness predicts that both over and underestimation may lead to levels of distress counterproductive to appropriate screening behaviors. Underestimation may also decrease risk-reducing behaviors. Therefore, our goal was to develop and describe the utility of a breast cancer risk-assessment program in a high volume breast center. Aims included: assessing women’s willingness to participate; educating women about risk factors and screening guidelines; providing an individualized objective measure of risk through the Gail Model; raising awareness of risk reduction research; and assessing the usefulness of education sessions for high risk women. Over the first six months, 3,954 of approximately 15,000 women presenting for mammography, indicated a desire for risk assessment. Assessment questionnaires and information sheets were mailed to these women. To date, 1,151 have been returned for risk-analysis. Of those processed, 307 women have been identified as high risk (>1.66% chance over next 5 years). Low-risk women receive a letter and educational materials. High-risk women meet in small groups with a RN to discuss their risk, risk reduction, and screening. To date, 27 women have completed an anonymous, investigator designed, post-session evaluation. All were Caucasian, with a mean age of 61 years and mean 5-year risk of 2.52%. Participants indicated the program provided new (96%) and useful (93%) risk information. Pre-session, 19% were “very concerned”, 30% “concerned”, 44% “a little concerned”, and 7% “not at all concerned” about their risk. Post-session, only 4% were “very concerned”, and 0% were lacking concern; results which support screening and risk factor behavior change. In fact, 62% stated intentions to make lifestyle/screening behavior changes. These early results indicate that nurses play an important role in providing women with desired breast cancer risk information, thereby supporting risk reduction and screening behaviors. AN: MN030014
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Women Want to Know Their Breast Cancer Risk?: Description of Need and Utility of a Risk Assessment Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159372-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Do Women Want to Know Their Breast Cancer Risk?: Description of Need and Utility of a Risk Assessment Program </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lally, Robin</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3800 Park Nicollet Blvd, Oncology Research, Suite 2S, Minneapolis, MN, 55416, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Heather C. Kehn; Jeanne Harkness</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Most women either overestimate or underestimate their risk of developing breast cancer. The self-regulation model of illness predicts that both over and underestimation may lead to levels of distress counterproductive to appropriate screening behaviors. Underestimation may also decrease risk-reducing behaviors. Therefore, our goal was to develop and describe the utility of a breast cancer risk-assessment program in a high volume breast center. Aims included: assessing women&rsquo;s willingness to participate; educating women about risk factors and screening guidelines; providing an individualized objective measure of risk through the Gail Model; raising awareness of risk reduction research; and assessing the usefulness of education sessions for high risk women. Over the first six months, 3,954 of approximately 15,000 women presenting for mammography, indicated a desire for risk assessment. Assessment questionnaires and information sheets were mailed to these women. To date, 1,151 have been returned for risk-analysis. Of those processed, 307 women have been identified as high risk (&gt;1.66% chance over next 5 years). Low-risk women receive a letter and educational materials. High-risk women meet in small groups with a RN to discuss their risk, risk reduction, and screening. To date, 27 women have completed an anonymous, investigator designed, post-session evaluation. All were Caucasian, with a mean age of 61 years and mean 5-year risk of 2.52%. Participants indicated the program provided new (96%) and useful (93%) risk information. Pre-session, 19% were &ldquo;very concerned&rdquo;, 30% &ldquo;concerned&rdquo;, 44% &ldquo;a little concerned&rdquo;, and 7% &ldquo;not at all concerned&rdquo; about their risk. Post-session, only 4% were &ldquo;very concerned&rdquo;, and 0% were lacking concern; results which support screening and risk factor behavior change. In fact, 62% stated intentions to make lifestyle/screening behavior changes. These early results indicate that nurses play an important role in providing women with desired breast cancer risk information, thereby supporting risk reduction and screening behaviors. AN: MN030014</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:57:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:57:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.