2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159373
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Workplace Empowerment and Magnet Hospital Characteristics: Making the Link
Abstract:
Workplace Empowerment and Magnet Hospital Characteristics: Making the Link
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Laschinger, Heather
Contact Address:SON, Health Sciences Addition, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada
Co-Authors:Joan M. Almost; Donnalene Tuer-Hodes
The purpose of this study was to examine the link between Kanter’s (1977, 1993) notion of work empowerment and magnet hospital characteristics. Magnet hospital research has shown that nurses are attracted to hospitals that support professional practice by promoting autonomy and control over the practice environment and by fostering good nurse/physician relationships. Further research is needed to identify factors that would promote the development and maintenance of these features. Kanter (1977, 1993) argues that social structures within the work environment that provide employees with access to information, support, resources, and opportunities to grow empower employees to accomplish their work in meaningful ways. For nurses, this means the ability to practice according to professional standards. A secondary analysis of data from 3 different studies of nurses was conducted. Survey data from two studies of staff nurses (a provincial sample of 237 nurses from urban teaching hospitals and a sample of 531 nurses from 3 rural hospitals) and one study of 55 Ontario acute care nurse practitioners were analyzed. Participants completed the Conditions of Work Effectiveness–II, the Nursing Work Index–Revised (NWI-R), and measures of job satisfaction. In all studies, empowerment was strongly related to the magnet hospital characteristics (r=.49 to .61, p=.0001). Both empowerment and magnet hospital characteristics were significant independent predictors of job satisfaction explaining 31.5% to 50% of the variance across studies. The results suggest that work environments that provide access to information, support, resources, opportunities to learn and grow as well as flexible job activities and strong alliances with co-workers can create work settings that have been shown to support professional practice and promote job satisfaction in the magnet hospital research. AN: MN030387
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorkplace Empowerment and Magnet Hospital Characteristics: Making the Linken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159373-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Workplace Empowerment and Magnet Hospital Characteristics: Making the Link </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Laschinger, Heather </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Health Sciences Addition, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joan M. Almost; Donnalene Tuer-Hodes</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the link between Kanter&rsquo;s (1977, 1993) notion of work empowerment and magnet hospital characteristics. Magnet hospital research has shown that nurses are attracted to hospitals that support professional practice by promoting autonomy and control over the practice environment and by fostering good nurse/physician relationships. Further research is needed to identify factors that would promote the development and maintenance of these features. Kanter (1977, 1993) argues that social structures within the work environment that provide employees with access to information, support, resources, and opportunities to grow empower employees to accomplish their work in meaningful ways. For nurses, this means the ability to practice according to professional standards. A secondary analysis of data from 3 different studies of nurses was conducted. Survey data from two studies of staff nurses (a provincial sample of 237 nurses from urban teaching hospitals and a sample of 531 nurses from 3 rural hospitals) and one study of 55 Ontario acute care nurse practitioners were analyzed. Participants completed the Conditions of Work Effectiveness&ndash;II, the Nursing Work Index&ndash;Revised (NWI-R), and measures of job satisfaction. In all studies, empowerment was strongly related to the magnet hospital characteristics (r=.49 to .61, p=.0001). Both empowerment and magnet hospital characteristics were significant independent predictors of job satisfaction explaining 31.5% to 50% of the variance across studies. The results suggest that work environments that provide access to information, support, resources, opportunities to learn and grow as well as flexible job activities and strong alliances with co-workers can create work settings that have been shown to support professional practice and promote job satisfaction in the magnet hospital research. AN: MN030387 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:57:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:57:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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