2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159374
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterning of pain and power with guided imagery
Abstract:
Patterning of pain and power with guided imagery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Lewandowski, Wendy
Contact Address:CON, 113 Henderson Hall, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Chronic pain, power, and guided imagery were conceptualized using Rogers’ Science of Unitary Human Beings. Rogers’ framework offered a new perspective to study the complex, multidimensional phenomenon of chronic pain, and to develop useful nursing theory. Pain and power were conceptualized as manifestations of human-environmental patterning. Guided imagery was a form of knowing participation in change. This study tested the hypothesis that persons with chronic pain, who used a guided imagery technique over four days, would experience less pain and increased power than those who did not receive the guided imagery intervention. An experimental, completely randomized design was used. Subjects were recruited from a home health care agency and senior apartment buildings in Northeastern Ohio. Subjects in the experimental group (n=21) used an audio taped guided imagery technique over four days; subjects in the control group (n=21) were monitored over the 4-day period. Measures of pain (Visual Analogue Scale) and power (Power as Knowing Participation in Change Tool) were obtained at five repeated intervals for subjects in both groups. Social desirability (Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale), imaging ability (Imaging Ability Questionnaire), and analgesic intake were measured but did not meet criteria for use as covariates. A repeated measures multivariate analysis of covariance was performed. Only pre-treatment power was identified as a significant covariate. Results showed a significant interaction for treatment by trials, indicating that there were changes in one or both of the dependent variables over time, F(3,117)=2.717, p < .05. Post hoc testing showed significant differences between the two groups for pain during the last two days of the study, F(1, 41)=6.297, p < .01 and F(1, 41)=3.802, p < .05. There were no significant group differences in power scores over the 4-day study period. AN: MN030258
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterning of pain and power with guided imageryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159374-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterning of pain and power with guided imagery </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lewandowski, Wendy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 113 Henderson Hall, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Chronic pain, power, and guided imagery were conceptualized using Rogers&rsquo; Science of Unitary Human Beings. Rogers&rsquo; framework offered a new perspective to study the complex, multidimensional phenomenon of chronic pain, and to develop useful nursing theory. Pain and power were conceptualized as manifestations of human-environmental patterning. Guided imagery was a form of knowing participation in change. This study tested the hypothesis that persons with chronic pain, who used a guided imagery technique over four days, would experience less pain and increased power than those who did not receive the guided imagery intervention. An experimental, completely randomized design was used. Subjects were recruited from a home health care agency and senior apartment buildings in Northeastern Ohio. Subjects in the experimental group (n=21) used an audio taped guided imagery technique over four days; subjects in the control group (n=21) were monitored over the 4-day period. Measures of pain (Visual Analogue Scale) and power (Power as Knowing Participation in Change Tool) were obtained at five repeated intervals for subjects in both groups. Social desirability (Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale), imaging ability (Imaging Ability Questionnaire), and analgesic intake were measured but did not meet criteria for use as covariates. A repeated measures multivariate analysis of covariance was performed. Only pre-treatment power was identified as a significant covariate. Results showed a significant interaction for treatment by trials, indicating that there were changes in one or both of the dependent variables over time, F(3,117)=2.717, p &lt; .05. Post hoc testing showed significant differences between the two groups for pain during the last two days of the study, F(1, 41)=6.297, p &lt; .01 and F(1, 41)=3.802, p &lt; .05. There were no significant group differences in power scores over the 4-day study period. AN: MN030258 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:57:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:57:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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