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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159376
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Support and Postpartum Depression (PPD) in Adolescents
Abstract:
Social Support and Postpartum Depression (PPD) in Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Logsdon, Cynthia
Contact Address:SON, 7514 Chestnut Hill Drive, Prospect, KY, 40059, USA
Co-Authors:John C Birkimer; Theresa Simpson; Stephen Looney
Twelve percent of all births in the United States are to adolescents. Parenting adolescents are often ill-prepared, perceive a lack of support, and are stressed, resulting in high rates (44%) of PPD. Interventions to strengthen social support have been effective in preventing PPD in other groups of high risk women. Therefore, the purpose of this experimental study was to determine the most effective of three social support interventions in preventing PPD in adolescents (n=109). The design of the study was a 2 x 4 factorial with repeated measures. All participants completed three questionnaires (Postpartum Support Questionnaire, Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem, and CES-D Depression Instrument) during late pregnancy and early postpartum. Based upon Self-efficacy Theory (Bandura, 1994) and Dual Coding Theory (Paivio, 1986) interventions consisted of a pamphlet and/or a video with identical content describing the effective use of social support. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (pamphlet, video, pamphlet and video) or the control group. Using ANCOVA with baseline values as covariates, we tested the prediction that lower rates of PPD would be found in the group receiving both the pamphlet and video intervention. However, there were no significant differences in the rates of PPD between the groups. Limitations of the study include less than desired power and a limited intervention. In the discussion, a model based upon Sidini & Braden (1998) is proposed for development of effective interventions to prevent PPD in adolescents. In a secondary analysis of the data using path analysis, PPD in adolescents was predicted by receiving more support and support being less important than expected, and by low self-esteem. These findings are slightly different from previous studies, and both research and clinical implications are discussed. AN: MN030331
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Support and Postpartum Depression (PPD) in Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159376-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social Support and Postpartum Depression (PPD) in Adolescents </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Logsdon, Cynthia</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 7514 Chestnut Hill Drive, Prospect, KY, 40059, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">John C Birkimer; Theresa Simpson; Stephen Looney </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Twelve percent of all births in the United States are to adolescents. Parenting adolescents are often ill-prepared, perceive a lack of support, and are stressed, resulting in high rates (44%) of PPD. Interventions to strengthen social support have been effective in preventing PPD in other groups of high risk women. Therefore, the purpose of this experimental study was to determine the most effective of three social support interventions in preventing PPD in adolescents (n=109). The design of the study was a 2 x 4 factorial with repeated measures. All participants completed three questionnaires (Postpartum Support Questionnaire, Rosenberg&rsquo;s Self-Esteem, and CES-D Depression Instrument) during late pregnancy and early postpartum. Based upon Self-efficacy Theory (Bandura, 1994) and Dual Coding Theory (Paivio, 1986) interventions consisted of a pamphlet and/or a video with identical content describing the effective use of social support. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (pamphlet, video, pamphlet and video) or the control group. Using ANCOVA with baseline values as covariates, we tested the prediction that lower rates of PPD would be found in the group receiving both the pamphlet and video intervention. However, there were no significant differences in the rates of PPD between the groups. Limitations of the study include less than desired power and a limited intervention. In the discussion, a model based upon Sidini &amp; Braden (1998) is proposed for development of effective interventions to prevent PPD in adolescents. In a secondary analysis of the data using path analysis, PPD in adolescents was predicted by receiving more support and support being less important than expected, and by low self-esteem. These findings are slightly different from previous studies, and both research and clinical implications are discussed. AN: MN030331</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:57:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:57:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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