2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159378
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing a Lingering Illness: Oncology Nursing, 1880-1950
Abstract:
Nursing a Lingering Illness: Oncology Nursing, 1880-1950
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Lusk, Brigid
Contact Address:SON, 736 Randall Street, Downers Grove, IL, 60515, USA
The purpose of this historical study was to examine the nursing care of patients with cancer from 1880 to 1950. During this period the term cancer was cloaked in euphemisms. Furthermore the care of patients with cancer was non-specific but encompassed the gamut of general patient care. However, with the introduction of anesthesia in the 1840s, antisepsis in the 1880s, and radiation therapy around 1900, physicians were able intervene in the course of this disease and nurses were increasingly involved in cancer’s complex palliative and curative therapies. Yet the range of nursing techniques and psycho-social therapies these nurses employed have not been described. Using a social history framework, this study followed historical research methodology. Primary sources included nursing and medical texts and articles of the period, hospital and nursing annual reports, and general readership articles and books related to cancer. Archival sources on cancer clinics, patient records, nursing education records, and nursing procedure books were also assessed. Secondary sources included papers on the historiography of cancer and cancer care. We concluded that amid an environment of disease concealment, fear of contagion, economic and familial strain, ineffective pain control, odor and disfigurement, there were tremendous opportunities for nurses. Trained nurses were called upon to educate the public and to facilitate the operation of cancer clinics. Surgical care, frequently in the home, demanded extensive nursing preparation and complex post-operative care. In chronic cases nurses were sometimes just adjured to do what they could. Visiting nurses acted as counselors, teachers and confidants, as well as bedside nurses. These skills provided a base for the emergence of oncology nursing as a specialty. AN: MN030235
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing a Lingering Illness: Oncology Nursing, 1880-1950en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159378-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing a Lingering Illness: Oncology Nursing, 1880-1950</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lusk, Brigid</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 736 Randall Street, Downers Grove, IL, 60515, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this historical study was to examine the nursing care of patients with cancer from 1880 to 1950. During this period the term cancer was cloaked in euphemisms. Furthermore the care of patients with cancer was non-specific but encompassed the gamut of general patient care. However, with the introduction of anesthesia in the 1840s, antisepsis in the 1880s, and radiation therapy around 1900, physicians were able intervene in the course of this disease and nurses were increasingly involved in cancer&rsquo;s complex palliative and curative therapies. Yet the range of nursing techniques and psycho-social therapies these nurses employed have not been described. Using a social history framework, this study followed historical research methodology. Primary sources included nursing and medical texts and articles of the period, hospital and nursing annual reports, and general readership articles and books related to cancer. Archival sources on cancer clinics, patient records, nursing education records, and nursing procedure books were also assessed. Secondary sources included papers on the historiography of cancer and cancer care. We concluded that amid an environment of disease concealment, fear of contagion, economic and familial strain, ineffective pain control, odor and disfigurement, there were tremendous opportunities for nurses. Trained nurses were called upon to educate the public and to facilitate the operation of cancer clinics. Surgical care, frequently in the home, demanded extensive nursing preparation and complex post-operative care. In chronic cases nurses were sometimes just adjured to do what they could. Visiting nurses acted as counselors, teachers and confidants, as well as bedside nurses. These skills provided a base for the emergence of oncology nursing as a specialty. AN: MN030235 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:57:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:57:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.