2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159379
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Practice Guidelines and Computers: Variation in Stakeholder Issues
Abstract:
Clinical Practice Guidelines and Computers: Variation in Stakeholder Issues
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Lyons, Stacie
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 30 A, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Co-Authors:Toni Tripp-Reimer; Bernard A. Sorofman; Jane DeWitt; Bonnie Bootsmiller; Bradley Doebbeling
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine variation in stakeholders’ issues related to the use of computers in the implementation of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Conceptual framework: Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation & Etzioni's Organizational Model. Subjects: A purposive sample of 322 individuals from 18 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers participated in fifty focus group sessions segmented by role: administrators, primary care providers, and clinical nursing staff. Participants were selected based on their knowledge about CPG and involvement in CPG implementation in their facilities. The settings were acute care hospitals with ambulatory care clinics with historically high or low levels of CPG adherence. Method: Content analysis. Results: Participants’ statements were nearly equally distributed between the three stakeholder groups. Overall, barrier topics were identified more than twice as often as facilitators were identified. Administrators differed dramatically by discussing facilitators twice as often as other participants. For providers and clinical staff, barriers predominated their discussions. Thirty-four computer-related themes were identified and clustered into five domains: computer functions, organizational factors, computer system design, personal concerns with computers, and data issues. Computer-related facilitators of CPG included mandatory CPG implementation and accessibility to computers and CPG. Barriers to CPG use included extensive documentation, difficulty locating data in the computer, reliance upon paper-based documents, voluntary CPG implementation, concerns with performance evaluation, low levels of computer literacy, and the time and workload associated with computing tasks. Decision support systems and electronic patient records were viewed both as facilitators and barriers of CPG use. Conclusions: Mandatory implementation, increased computer access for clinical staff, and design enhancements to ease, speed, limit, and facilitate computerized documentation tasks may increase users’ acceptance of and adherence to clinical practice guidelines. AN: MN030105
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Practice Guidelines and Computers: Variation in Stakeholder Issuesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159379-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Clinical Practice Guidelines and Computers: Variation in Stakeholder Issues </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lyons, Stacie</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 30 A, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Toni Tripp-Reimer; Bernard A. Sorofman; Jane DeWitt; Bonnie Bootsmiller; Bradley Doebbeling </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine variation in stakeholders&rsquo; issues related to the use of computers in the implementation of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Conceptual framework: Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation &amp; Etzioni's Organizational Model. Subjects: A purposive sample of 322 individuals from 18 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers participated in fifty focus group sessions segmented by role: administrators, primary care providers, and clinical nursing staff. Participants were selected based on their knowledge about CPG and involvement in CPG implementation in their facilities. The settings were acute care hospitals with ambulatory care clinics with historically high or low levels of CPG adherence. Method: Content analysis. Results: Participants&rsquo; statements were nearly equally distributed between the three stakeholder groups. Overall, barrier topics were identified more than twice as often as facilitators were identified. Administrators differed dramatically by discussing facilitators twice as often as other participants. For providers and clinical staff, barriers predominated their discussions. Thirty-four computer-related themes were identified and clustered into five domains: computer functions, organizational factors, computer system design, personal concerns with computers, and data issues. Computer-related facilitators of CPG included mandatory CPG implementation and accessibility to computers and CPG. Barriers to CPG use included extensive documentation, difficulty locating data in the computer, reliance upon paper-based documents, voluntary CPG implementation, concerns with performance evaluation, low levels of computer literacy, and the time and workload associated with computing tasks. Decision support systems and electronic patient records were viewed both as facilitators and barriers of CPG use. Conclusions: Mandatory implementation, increased computer access for clinical staff, and design enhancements to ease, speed, limit, and facilitate computerized documentation tasks may increase users&rsquo; acceptance of and adherence to clinical practice guidelines. AN: MN030105 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:57:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:57:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.