2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159381
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Roles of Attachment and the Cognitive Triad in Depression
Abstract:
Roles of Attachment and the Cognitive Triad in Depression
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Martin, Michelle
Contact Address:SON, 811 Ninth Street, Suite #200, Durham, NC, 27705, USA
Roles of Attachment and the Cognitive Triad in Depression PURPOSE: Depression is the most common mental illness in adults. It is believed that interpersonal factors, such as attachment styles, and intra-psychic factors, such as a negative cognitive triad (negative views of self, future, and world), play a role in the development of depression. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between attachment style, cognitive triad, and depression and to determine if attachment styles and depression are mediated by the cognitive triad. FRAMEWORK: Roy's (1990) Adaptation Model served as the framework, with Bowlby's attachment theory and Beck's cognitive theory of depression providing theoretical underpinnings. METHODS: This study used a cross-sectional, descriptive and correlational design. A convenience sample of 112 adults aged 21-70 was recruited. Data were collected by subject self-report, with the completion of the Relationship Questionnaire, Cognitive Triad Inventory (CTI), Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS). RESULTS: There was a positive correlation between the CTI and the SDS (r=0.9, p< .01). Those with higher CTI scores (more negative views) were more likely to be depressed. The CTI was inversely correlated, with the secure attachment style (r=-0.7, p< .01), and reported the lowest CTI scores. The CTI was positively correlated with a fearful attachment style (r=0.8, p< .01), and this style reported the highest CTI scores. Using regression, attachment styles were found to predict cognitive triad Adj. R2=0.8, p< .001); and depression Adj. R2=0.8, p < .001). Those with a fearful attachment style reported the highest scores on the CTI and SDS, followed by preoccupied and dismissing styles when compared to the secure attachment style. Findings from hierarchical regression found that the cognitive triad partially mediated the relationship between attachment styles and depression when demographic variables were controlled. AN: MN030317
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRoles of Attachment and the Cognitive Triad in Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159381-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Roles of Attachment and the Cognitive Triad in Depression </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martin, Michelle</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 811 Ninth Street, Suite #200, Durham, NC, 27705, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Roles of Attachment and the Cognitive Triad in Depression PURPOSE: Depression is the most common mental illness in adults. It is believed that interpersonal factors, such as attachment styles, and intra-psychic factors, such as a negative cognitive triad (negative views of self, future, and world), play a role in the development of depression. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between attachment style, cognitive triad, and depression and to determine if attachment styles and depression are mediated by the cognitive triad. FRAMEWORK: Roy's (1990) Adaptation Model served as the framework, with Bowlby's attachment theory and Beck's cognitive theory of depression providing theoretical underpinnings. METHODS: This study used a cross-sectional, descriptive and correlational design. A convenience sample of 112 adults aged 21-70 was recruited. Data were collected by subject self-report, with the completion of the Relationship Questionnaire, Cognitive Triad Inventory (CTI), Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS). RESULTS: There was a positive correlation between the CTI and the SDS (r=0.9, p&lt; .01). Those with higher CTI scores (more negative views) were more likely to be depressed. The CTI was inversely correlated, with the secure attachment style (r=-0.7, p&lt; .01), and reported the lowest CTI scores. The CTI was positively correlated with a fearful attachment style (r=0.8, p&lt; .01), and this style reported the highest CTI scores. Using regression, attachment styles were found to predict cognitive triad Adj. R2=0.8, p&lt; .001); and depression Adj. R2=0.8, p &lt; .001). Those with a fearful attachment style reported the highest scores on the CTI and SDS, followed by preoccupied and dismissing styles when compared to the secure attachment style. Findings from hierarchical regression found that the cognitive triad partially mediated the relationship between attachment styles and depression when demographic variables were controlled. AN: MN030317 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:57:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:57:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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