2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159382
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Urology Surgery
Abstract:
Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Urology Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Maxson, Pamela
Contact Address:Nursing, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA
Co-Authors:Ann Marie Dose
Purpose: The purpose was to identify the relationship among demographics, acceptable pain intensity levels, patient satisfaction, and reported pain scores. Conceptual Framework: There have been no reports in the literature describing patients’ acceptable pain intensity levels and their actual reported postoperative pain scores. Identifying patients’ acceptable pain intensity levels is important in designing pain management strategies that meet patients’ needs. Subjects: This study included 200 patients (168 males, 32 females), ranging in age from 26-88. Surgical procedures varied with 118 radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP), 37 nephrectomy, 14 cystectomy, and 31 other. Method: Patients were consented prior to this prospective patient interview, medical record review, and written survey. Data collected included demographics, type of surgery, admission medications, pharmacologic interventions before, during, and after surgery, daily pain intensity levels and acceptable pain intensity levels, and a satisfaction survey administered just prior to discharge. Results: Pain scores ranged from 0 – 10 with maximum mean pain scores of 5 and minimum mean pain scores of 1. Acceptable pain score means were 1 to 2. Pain scores varied among surgical procedure. Patients with nephrectomy and cystectomy surgery had higher pain scores and patients with RRP had lower pain scores. Overall patient satisfaction was 96%, but 58% reported sleep disturbances and interference with activities due to pain, 49% felt that pain affected their emotions and 47% reported effects on mood. Conclusions: Pain scores varied depending on surgical procedure. Pain scores tended to be higher for patients undergoing surgeries other than RRPs. Acceptable pain scores were lower than reported pain scores in all surgical procedures except RRPs, indicating better pain management strategies and education for patients and staff are needed. Even with high overall patient satisfaction, pain did affect other factors important to recovery from surgery. AN: MN030269
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePostoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Urology Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159382-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Urology Surgery </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Maxson, Pamela</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann Marie Dose</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose was to identify the relationship among demographics, acceptable pain intensity levels, patient satisfaction, and reported pain scores. Conceptual Framework: There have been no reports in the literature describing patients&rsquo; acceptable pain intensity levels and their actual reported postoperative pain scores. Identifying patients&rsquo; acceptable pain intensity levels is important in designing pain management strategies that meet patients&rsquo; needs. Subjects: This study included 200 patients (168 males, 32 females), ranging in age from 26-88. Surgical procedures varied with 118 radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP), 37 nephrectomy, 14 cystectomy, and 31 other. Method: Patients were consented prior to this prospective patient interview, medical record review, and written survey. Data collected included demographics, type of surgery, admission medications, pharmacologic interventions before, during, and after surgery, daily pain intensity levels and acceptable pain intensity levels, and a satisfaction survey administered just prior to discharge. Results: Pain scores ranged from 0 &ndash; 10 with maximum mean pain scores of 5 and minimum mean pain scores of 1. Acceptable pain score means were 1 to 2. Pain scores varied among surgical procedure. Patients with nephrectomy and cystectomy surgery had higher pain scores and patients with RRP had lower pain scores. Overall patient satisfaction was 96%, but 58% reported sleep disturbances and interference with activities due to pain, 49% felt that pain affected their emotions and 47% reported effects on mood. Conclusions: Pain scores varied depending on surgical procedure. Pain scores tended to be higher for patients undergoing surgeries other than RRPs. Acceptable pain scores were lower than reported pain scores in all surgical procedures except RRPs, indicating better pain management strategies and education for patients and staff are needed. Even with high overall patient satisfaction, pain did affect other factors important to recovery from surgery. AN: MN030269 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:57:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:57:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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