Factors that make it easy or difficult to continue in an exercise/activity program: Perceptions of older adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159383
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors that make it easy or difficult to continue in an exercise/activity program: Perceptions of older adults
Abstract:
Factors that make it easy or difficult to continue in an exercise/activity program: Perceptions of older adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:McCabe, Barbara
Contact Address:CON, 310 Fairfield Hall, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0620, USA
Co-Authors:Jay L. Hawkins
The purpose of this study was to document perceptions of older adults about factors that make it easy or difficult to continue in an exercise/activity program. Extant literature documents the importance of regular exercise in maintaining quality of life for older adults. Approximately 50% of older adults stop an exercise program within the first six months, less is known about what facilitates participation in an exercise program. The conceptual framework for this study was adapted from the work of O'Neill & Reid (1991) who identified four basic factors affecting exercise involvement: Physical Health, Psychological, Knowledge, and Administrative. Participants were 28 older adults residing in a retirement/assisted living facility. Content analysis was used to analyze responses of participants to two open-ended questions. The most common category of factors influencing participation in an exercise program was Administrative followed by Psychological, Physical Health, and Knowledge categories. Implications: convenience and a supportive environment are facilitators of exercise for the older adult. The data lend support to the importance of exercise counseling by health care providers. AN: MN030172
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors that make it easy or difficult to continue in an exercise/activity program: Perceptions of older adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159383-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors that make it easy or difficult to continue in an exercise/activity program: Perceptions of older adults </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCabe, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 310 Fairfield Hall, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0620, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jay L. Hawkins</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to document perceptions of older adults about factors that make it easy or difficult to continue in an exercise/activity program. Extant literature documents the importance of regular exercise in maintaining quality of life for older adults. Approximately 50% of older adults stop an exercise program within the first six months, less is known about what facilitates participation in an exercise program. The conceptual framework for this study was adapted from the work of O'Neill &amp; Reid (1991) who identified four basic factors affecting exercise involvement: Physical Health, Psychological, Knowledge, and Administrative. Participants were 28 older adults residing in a retirement/assisted living facility. Content analysis was used to analyze responses of participants to two open-ended questions. The most common category of factors influencing participation in an exercise program was Administrative followed by Psychological, Physical Health, and Knowledge categories. Implications: convenience and a supportive environment are facilitators of exercise for the older adult. The data lend support to the importance of exercise counseling by health care providers. AN: MN030172 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:57:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:57:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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