2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159384
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Families Perceptions of Medication Administration in the School Setting
Abstract:
Families Perceptions of Medication Administration in the School Setting
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:McCarthy, Marie
Contact Address:CON, 2104 Glendale Rd, Iowa City, IA, 52245, USA
Co-Authors:Daniel Clay; Michael W. Kelly; Karen Farris
Purpose: Approximately 5% of children receive medication in school each day, with 76% of school nurses reporting that unlicensed personnel dispense these medications in their schools (McCarthy, Kelly, & Reed, 2000). Changes in education and related laws and increased use of medications for children have resulted in concerns related to medication administration in schools. The purpose of this study is to assess how children with chronic health conditions and their parents perceive the medication administration process in their schools. Methods: This descriptive study uses a cross sectional nonexperimental design. The targeted populations are children with diabetes, asthma, and ADHD because children with these conditions often require medication during school. Based on discussions with clinic staff, 75 families from each of the three target clinics will be invited to participate. To date, 75 children with diabetes, 20 children with asthma, and 18 with ADHD, and their parents, have participated from a Children's Hospital in a rural Midwestern state. Two surveys, a 31-item child survey and a parallel 33-item parent survey, were developed for this study. Children less than 12 years of age are interviewed using the child survey as a structured interview guide. The surveys include questions on timing of medication administration, transportation of medication, written medication policies, provisions for field trips, experiences with medication errors, consequences of errors, self administration practices, and communication among educators, families, and health care providers. Results: Descriptive statistics will be obtained on each survey item, and comparisons made between parent and child responses and among the three chronic conditions. Preliminary analyses suggest that parents and children report problems with medication administration, although parental concerns differ from child concerns. Conclusions: Implications for current practice and future research will be presented. AN: MN030173
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamilies Perceptions of Medication Administration in the School Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159384-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Families Perceptions of Medication Administration in the School Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCarthy, Marie</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 2104 Glendale Rd, Iowa City, IA, 52245, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Daniel Clay; Michael W. Kelly; Karen Farris </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Approximately 5% of children receive medication in school each day, with 76% of school nurses reporting that unlicensed personnel dispense these medications in their schools (McCarthy, Kelly, &amp; Reed, 2000). Changes in education and related laws and increased use of medications for children have resulted in concerns related to medication administration in schools. The purpose of this study is to assess how children with chronic health conditions and their parents perceive the medication administration process in their schools. Methods: This descriptive study uses a cross sectional nonexperimental design. The targeted populations are children with diabetes, asthma, and ADHD because children with these conditions often require medication during school. Based on discussions with clinic staff, 75 families from each of the three target clinics will be invited to participate. To date, 75 children with diabetes, 20 children with asthma, and 18 with ADHD, and their parents, have participated from a Children's Hospital in a rural Midwestern state. Two surveys, a 31-item child survey and a parallel 33-item parent survey, were developed for this study. Children less than 12 years of age are interviewed using the child survey as a structured interview guide. The surveys include questions on timing of medication administration, transportation of medication, written medication policies, provisions for field trips, experiences with medication errors, consequences of errors, self administration practices, and communication among educators, families, and health care providers. Results: Descriptive statistics will be obtained on each survey item, and comparisons made between parent and child responses and among the three chronic conditions. Preliminary analyses suggest that parents and children report problems with medication administration, although parental concerns differ from child concerns. Conclusions: Implications for current practice and future research will be presented. AN: MN030173</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:57:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:57:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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