2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159385
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of the Glucose Method in Detecting Aspiration
Abstract:
Efficacy of the Glucose Method in Detecting Aspiration
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Metheny, Norma
Contact Address: Adult Health, 3525 Caroline, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Co-Authors:Barbara J. Stewart; Thomas Dahms; Ray E Clouse; Yie-Hwa Chang
Purpose: This study was designed to determine the extent to which glucose present in suctioned tracheal secretions predicts aspiration associated with tube feedings. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Tracheal secretions normally contain less than 5 mg/dL of glucose; since most enteral formulas are relatively rich in glucose, some clinicians use the glucose method to assess for aspiration. A value > 20 mg/dL is commonly accepted as indicating aspiration of glucose-rich formula. Subjects: A total of 182 New Zealand White rabbits (161 experimental and 21 control) were used in the study; 161 acutely ill humans furnished the gastric juice mixed with the enteral formulas used in the experimental animals. Method: Human gastric juice was mixed 1:1 with either a low, moderate or high glucose containing enteral formula prior to being instilled intratracheally into 161 anesthetized intubated animals. For the control animals, normal saline was instilled intratracheally. Three separate boluses of the mixture were infused over a 6-hour period. The animals were suctioned three times and the secretions were analyzed for glucose by two methods (a visual test and a laboratory assay). In addition, arterial blood glucose was measured hourly throughout the experiment. Results: The majority of tracheal secretions from the experimental animals (93-98%) were positive for glucose, regardless of the type of enteral formula used. However, glucose concentrations > 20 mg/dL were also found in 47% of the tracheal secretions obtained from the control animals. Tracheal glucose concentrations were positively correlated with arterial blood glucose concentrations near the time of suctioning (r=.482, p < .001). Conclusions: Sensitivity of the glucose method is high, but its specificity is low. Variations in glucose concentrations in tracheal secretions are influenced more by blood glucose concentrations than by the type of enteral formula used. There is little basis for use of this method in clinical practice. AN: MN030149
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of the Glucose Method in Detecting Aspirationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159385-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Efficacy of the Glucose Method in Detecting Aspiration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Metheny, Norma</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value"> Adult Health, 3525 Caroline, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara J. Stewart; Thomas Dahms; Ray E Clouse; Yie-Hwa Chang </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study was designed to determine the extent to which glucose present in suctioned tracheal secretions predicts aspiration associated with tube feedings. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Tracheal secretions normally contain less than 5 mg/dL of glucose; since most enteral formulas are relatively rich in glucose, some clinicians use the glucose method to assess for aspiration. A value &gt; 20 mg/dL is commonly accepted as indicating aspiration of glucose-rich formula. Subjects: A total of 182 New Zealand White rabbits (161 experimental and 21 control) were used in the study; 161 acutely ill humans furnished the gastric juice mixed with the enteral formulas used in the experimental animals. Method: Human gastric juice was mixed 1:1 with either a low, moderate or high glucose containing enteral formula prior to being instilled intratracheally into 161 anesthetized intubated animals. For the control animals, normal saline was instilled intratracheally. Three separate boluses of the mixture were infused over a 6-hour period. The animals were suctioned three times and the secretions were analyzed for glucose by two methods (a visual test and a laboratory assay). In addition, arterial blood glucose was measured hourly throughout the experiment. Results: The majority of tracheal secretions from the experimental animals (93-98%) were positive for glucose, regardless of the type of enteral formula used. However, glucose concentrations &gt; 20 mg/dL were also found in 47% of the tracheal secretions obtained from the control animals. Tracheal glucose concentrations were positively correlated with arterial blood glucose concentrations near the time of suctioning (r=.482, p &lt; .001). Conclusions: Sensitivity of the glucose method is high, but its specificity is low. Variations in glucose concentrations in tracheal secretions are influenced more by blood glucose concentrations than by the type of enteral formula used. There is little basis for use of this method in clinical practice. AN: MN030149 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:57:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:57:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.