2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159386
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of the Curriculum on International Research Ethics
Abstract:
Evaluation of the Curriculum on International Research Ethics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Misner, Susan
Contact Address:CON, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Beverly J. McElmurry; Teresa Savage; Elissa Dresden; Linda McCreary; Judy Popovich
During recent years, global concerns including infectious diseases, the environment, and disparities in health status across national and cultural groups have increased interest in international health and health research. As the largest number of health professionals worldwide, nurses have a significant role in addressing global health issues. International research by nursing scientists may positively impact global health and provide opportunities for professional development, including increased awareness of ethics and scientific integrity. For the last six years, the Minority International Research Training (MIRT) program of the College of Nursing, University of Illinois, has provided international research training opportunities for nursing students. Under the direct supervision of faculty research mentors, nursing students participate in specific programs of research in selected international settings. The Curriculum on International Research Ethics (CIRE) was developed to prepare nursing students and research team members in research ethics prior to participation in international research activities. The CIRE has been introduced to both faculty and student MIRT participants using four modules that apply concepts from classic ethical theories, international guidelines on research ethics, and cultural studies. In the current study, a formative evaluation of the CIRE investigated the questions: 1) What type of preparation in ethics is required for nurses’ participation in international research activities, and 2) What aspects of a curriculum on international research ethics do nursing students and faculty members report as beneficial following an international research experience? Using content analysis of text data from focus groups and student/faculty reports, themes regarding key content areas for international research ethics preparation have been identified. In addition, the study findings cover perceptions of students about the content and format of the CIRE with recommendations for continuing development of curricula on research ethics. AN: MN030159
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of the Curriculum on International Research Ethicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159386-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of the Curriculum on International Research Ethics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Misner, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beverly J. McElmurry; Teresa Savage; Elissa Dresden; Linda McCreary; Judy Popovich </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">During recent years, global concerns including infectious diseases, the environment, and disparities in health status across national and cultural groups have increased interest in international health and health research. As the largest number of health professionals worldwide, nurses have a significant role in addressing global health issues. International research by nursing scientists may positively impact global health and provide opportunities for professional development, including increased awareness of ethics and scientific integrity. For the last six years, the Minority International Research Training (MIRT) program of the College of Nursing, University of Illinois, has provided international research training opportunities for nursing students. Under the direct supervision of faculty research mentors, nursing students participate in specific programs of research in selected international settings. The Curriculum on International Research Ethics (CIRE) was developed to prepare nursing students and research team members in research ethics prior to participation in international research activities. The CIRE has been introduced to both faculty and student MIRT participants using four modules that apply concepts from classic ethical theories, international guidelines on research ethics, and cultural studies. In the current study, a formative evaluation of the CIRE investigated the questions: 1) What type of preparation in ethics is required for nurses&rsquo; participation in international research activities, and 2) What aspects of a curriculum on international research ethics do nursing students and faculty members report as beneficial following an international research experience? Using content analysis of text data from focus groups and student/faculty reports, themes regarding key content areas for international research ethics preparation have been identified. In addition, the study findings cover perceptions of students about the content and format of the CIRE with recommendations for continuing development of curricula on research ethics. AN: MN030159 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:58:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:58:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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