The influence of attitudes, beliefs, and expectations related to postoperative pain on pain ratings and analgesia use

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159387
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The influence of attitudes, beliefs, and expectations related to postoperative pain on pain ratings and analgesia use
Abstract:
The influence of attitudes, beliefs, and expectations related to postoperative pain on pain ratings and analgesia use
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Moddeman, Gail
Contact Address:College of Nursing & Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA
Co-Authors:Cindra Holland
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of attitudes, beliefs, and expectations related to pain on the postoperative pain experience and provide increased insight into postoperative pain management. Framework: The Gate Control Theory addressing the many facets of pain combined with Fishbein's Theory of Attitude Acquisition provided guidance for this study. Subjects: Eighty-five women, who had experienced an abdominal hysterectomy and met inclusion criteria voluntarily gave their informed consent. Method: Data were collected on the second postoperative day. A 10-cm VAS was used to measure postoperative pain. Attitudes, beliefs, and expectations about pain were measured on a six-point Likert scale, asking the women to rate agreement or disagreement with statements related to pain prior to this hospitalization and statements specific to this surgical experience. This scale was developed for this study. All PCA demands were recorded and doses of PCA were converted to morphine equivalents. Results: Higher pain rating on the VAS were related to women agreeing that they 'had trouble dealing with their pain' and 'the nurse should know when I am in pain'. Fifty women (57%)agreed they had only taken their pain medicine 'when they were in severe pain.' Data were dichotomized into levels of disagreement and agreement. T-test results indicated that women who agreed with 'my pain was worse than I expected' made significantly more demands on the PCA than those disagreeing with the statement. Conclusion: Nurses must be aware of belief systems when they care for postoperative patients to assure pain relief. An adequate preoperative assessment of the patient's attitudes, beliefs, and expectations may predict the patient's potential for reporting and collaborating with the nurse in postoperative pain management. AN: MN030349
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe influence of attitudes, beliefs, and expectations related to postoperative pain on pain ratings and analgesia useen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159387-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The influence of attitudes, beliefs, and expectations related to postoperative pain on pain ratings and analgesia use </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moddeman, Gail</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing &amp; Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cindra Holland </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of attitudes, beliefs, and expectations related to pain on the postoperative pain experience and provide increased insight into postoperative pain management. Framework: The Gate Control Theory addressing the many facets of pain combined with Fishbein's Theory of Attitude Acquisition provided guidance for this study. Subjects: Eighty-five women, who had experienced an abdominal hysterectomy and met inclusion criteria voluntarily gave their informed consent. Method: Data were collected on the second postoperative day. A 10-cm VAS was used to measure postoperative pain. Attitudes, beliefs, and expectations about pain were measured on a six-point Likert scale, asking the women to rate agreement or disagreement with statements related to pain prior to this hospitalization and statements specific to this surgical experience. This scale was developed for this study. All PCA demands were recorded and doses of PCA were converted to morphine equivalents. Results: Higher pain rating on the VAS were related to women agreeing that they 'had trouble dealing with their pain' and 'the nurse should know when I am in pain'. Fifty women (57%)agreed they had only taken their pain medicine 'when they were in severe pain.' Data were dichotomized into levels of disagreement and agreement. T-test results indicated that women who agreed with 'my pain was worse than I expected' made significantly more demands on the PCA than those disagreeing with the statement. Conclusion: Nurses must be aware of belief systems when they care for postoperative patients to assure pain relief. An adequate preoperative assessment of the patient's attitudes, beliefs, and expectations may predict the patient's potential for reporting and collaborating with the nurse in postoperative pain management. AN: MN030349 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:58:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:58:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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