Nutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers--A Pilot Program for Rural, Low-Income Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159391
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers--A Pilot Program for Rural, Low-Income Families
Abstract:
Nutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers--A Pilot Program for Rural, Low-Income Families
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Omar, Mildred
Contact Address:CON, A230 Life Sciences, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Co-Authors:Gayle Coleman; Sharon Hoerr
Poverty is a major factor placing families at risk for poor health and nutrition. Inadequate toddler nutrition can result in poor cognitive development, physical growth retardation, and childhood obesity. In low-income populations, negative attitudes toward nutrition are related to poor parental feeding practices. Mothers’ nutritional knowledge strongly relates to the quality of children’s dietary consumption. The purpose of this study was to examine rural, low-income mothers’ knowledge, attitudes, mealtime practices and dietary intake regarding toddler nutrition before and after implementation of a nutrition education intervention. The Nutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers intervention emphasized the acquisition of knowledge and behavioral skills for feeding toddlers. The theory of dependent care guided the study. A quasi-experimental longitudinal design was used. A convenience sample of 38 Early Head Start families in 4 rural counties in a north central state participated. Mothers completed the Caregivers’ Mealtime Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Feeding Toddlers instrument, developed by the investigators. Two 24-hour diet recalls were used to assess the dietary intake of the mothers and their toddlers. Six months after the nutrition education intervention, no significant differences were found between groups in knowledge, attitudes, and feeding practices. Data analysis demonstrated that most mothers in both groups had knowledge and expressed positive attitudes towards appropriate toddler feeding. Mealtime practices and the diet recalls revealed that although mothers knew what they should do regarding feeding their toddlers, most did not incorporate this into their daily routines. Toddlers in this study had a high incidence of inadequate amount of food intake, and not a single toddler ate the recommended number of servings from all five-food groups. The findings suggest that nutrition education classes alone may be inadequate to enhance low-income caregivers’ ability to provide proper toddler nutrition. Additional emphasis may be needed to promote parents’ confidence in their ability to feed toddlers effectively. AN: MN030240
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers--A Pilot Program for Rural, Low-Income Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159391-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers--A Pilot Program for Rural, Low-Income Families </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Omar, Mildred</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, A230 Life Sciences, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gayle Coleman; Sharon Hoerr</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Poverty is a major factor placing families at risk for poor health and nutrition. Inadequate toddler nutrition can result in poor cognitive development, physical growth retardation, and childhood obesity. In low-income populations, negative attitudes toward nutrition are related to poor parental feeding practices. Mothers&rsquo; nutritional knowledge strongly relates to the quality of children&rsquo;s dietary consumption. The purpose of this study was to examine rural, low-income mothers&rsquo; knowledge, attitudes, mealtime practices and dietary intake regarding toddler nutrition before and after implementation of a nutrition education intervention. The Nutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers intervention emphasized the acquisition of knowledge and behavioral skills for feeding toddlers. The theory of dependent care guided the study. A quasi-experimental longitudinal design was used. A convenience sample of 38 Early Head Start families in 4 rural counties in a north central state participated. Mothers completed the Caregivers&rsquo; Mealtime Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Feeding Toddlers instrument, developed by the investigators. Two 24-hour diet recalls were used to assess the dietary intake of the mothers and their toddlers. Six months after the nutrition education intervention, no significant differences were found between groups in knowledge, attitudes, and feeding practices. Data analysis demonstrated that most mothers in both groups had knowledge and expressed positive attitudes towards appropriate toddler feeding. Mealtime practices and the diet recalls revealed that although mothers knew what they should do regarding feeding their toddlers, most did not incorporate this into their daily routines. Toddlers in this study had a high incidence of inadequate amount of food intake, and not a single toddler ate the recommended number of servings from all five-food groups. The findings suggest that nutrition education classes alone may be inadequate to enhance low-income caregivers&rsquo; ability to provide proper toddler nutrition. Additional emphasis may be needed to promote parents&rsquo; confidence in their ability to feed toddlers effectively. AN: MN030240 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:58:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:58:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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