2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159393
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Functioning and Lower Extremity Changes in Injection Drug Users
Abstract:
Functioning and Lower Extremity Changes in Injection Drug Users
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Pieper, Barbara
Contact Address:CON, 1356 Yorkshire, Grosse Pointe Park, MI, 48230, USA
Co-Authors:Thomas Templin
Persons who have used injected drugs are highly susceptible to chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which pain mediates the relationship between CVI severity and functioning for persons with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Participants were 59 men and 41 women (M age=47.3 years) from a medical clinic (n=73) or methadone treatment clinic (n=27) who had a history of IDU (M years=20.6 years). A cross sectional design was used with nonrandom sample selection. They responded to questionnaires about their background, drug use, leg pain, pain on functioning and had their legs examined. CVI with ulcers was present in 57; marked CVI in 31; mild CVI in 5; and no CVI in 7. Leg pain was highly related to CVI severity. The greatest interference to the legs was stair climbing. Functioning was strongly related to CVI. The path analysis showed leg pain as the mediator of the relationship between CVI and functioning controlling for the effects of other chronic diseases. In conclusion, pain is significantly greater for persons with severe CVI. The relationship between CVI and function can be explained by leg pain. Assessment of the legs of persons who have used injected drugs is critical. AN: MN030252
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFunctioning and Lower Extremity Changes in Injection Drug Usersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159393-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Functioning and Lower Extremity Changes in Injection Drug Users</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pieper, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 1356 Yorkshire, Grosse Pointe Park, MI, 48230, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Thomas Templin</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Persons who have used injected drugs are highly susceptible to chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which pain mediates the relationship between CVI severity and functioning for persons with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Participants were 59 men and 41 women (M age=47.3 years) from a medical clinic (n=73) or methadone treatment clinic (n=27) who had a history of IDU (M years=20.6 years). A cross sectional design was used with nonrandom sample selection. They responded to questionnaires about their background, drug use, leg pain, pain on functioning and had their legs examined. CVI with ulcers was present in 57; marked CVI in 31; mild CVI in 5; and no CVI in 7. Leg pain was highly related to CVI severity. The greatest interference to the legs was stair climbing. Functioning was strongly related to CVI. The path analysis showed leg pain as the mediator of the relationship between CVI and functioning controlling for the effects of other chronic diseases. In conclusion, pain is significantly greater for persons with severe CVI. The relationship between CVI and function can be explained by leg pain. Assessment of the legs of persons who have used injected drugs is critical. AN: MN030252 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:58:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:58:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.