2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159395
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life and Adherence to Regimen in Type II Diabetes
Abstract:
Quality of Life and Adherence to Regimen in Type II Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Poradzisz, Michele
Contact Address:SON, 3700 W. 103rd Street, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA
Co-Authors:Carol E. Ferrans; Laurie Quinn
This report focuses on the second phase of a two-part, mixed-methods study that examined the influence of selected variables on quality of life (QOL) and adherence to regimen in a convenience sample of adults with Type 2 diabetes. The conceptual framework proposed a reciprocal relationship between QOL and adherence, with both outcomes influenced by self-efficacy, illness demand, family support, and satisfaction with care. In Phase 2, selected respondents (n=23) whose scores on a quantitative measure of adherence were in the upper or lower third participated in an interview that explored the individual's perceptions about positive and negative influences on adherence. Interview transcripts were coded and matrix outputs were created for code families within the high and low adherence groups. Examination of the matrices demonstrated differences between the two groups and provided insights into the personal attributes and situational characteristics that affected adherence. Positive factors included accepting diet and exercise recommendations as part of one's lifestyle; integrating organizational strategies into a consistent daily routine; supportive relationships with other family members who follow a similar lifestyle; and relationships with health care providers that emphasize collaboration and flexibility. Negative factors included food cravings; feelings of helplessness or inability to control oneself in home, work, or social situations; and nagging or indifference of significant family members. Respondents generally held the belief that adherence improves psychological and/or physical status, thus enhancing QOL. However, many of the low adherers focused on the negative effects of adherence upon QOL, namely, loss of freedom, spontaneity and short-term gratification; this negative focus reinforced feelings of low self-efficacy. Similar to the results from the quantitative measures (Phase 1), the interview findings established self-efficacy as the most important variable for both adherence and QOL. These results suggest that diabetes professionals should focus on fostering self-efficacy in persons with Type 2 diabetes. AN: MN030287
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life and Adherence to Regimen in Type II Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159395-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality of Life and Adherence to Regimen in Type II Diabetes </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Poradzisz, Michele</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 3700 W. 103rd Street, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol E. Ferrans; Laurie Quinn</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This report focuses on the second phase of a two-part, mixed-methods study that examined the influence of selected variables on quality of life (QOL) and adherence to regimen in a convenience sample of adults with Type 2 diabetes. The conceptual framework proposed a reciprocal relationship between QOL and adherence, with both outcomes influenced by self-efficacy, illness demand, family support, and satisfaction with care. In Phase 2, selected respondents (n=23) whose scores on a quantitative measure of adherence were in the upper or lower third participated in an interview that explored the individual's perceptions about positive and negative influences on adherence. Interview transcripts were coded and matrix outputs were created for code families within the high and low adherence groups. Examination of the matrices demonstrated differences between the two groups and provided insights into the personal attributes and situational characteristics that affected adherence. Positive factors included accepting diet and exercise recommendations as part of one's lifestyle; integrating organizational strategies into a consistent daily routine; supportive relationships with other family members who follow a similar lifestyle; and relationships with health care providers that emphasize collaboration and flexibility. Negative factors included food cravings; feelings of helplessness or inability to control oneself in home, work, or social situations; and nagging or indifference of significant family members. Respondents generally held the belief that adherence improves psychological and/or physical status, thus enhancing QOL. However, many of the low adherers focused on the negative effects of adherence upon QOL, namely, loss of freedom, spontaneity and short-term gratification; this negative focus reinforced feelings of low self-efficacy. Similar to the results from the quantitative measures (Phase 1), the interview findings established self-efficacy as the most important variable for both adherence and QOL. These results suggest that diabetes professionals should focus on fostering self-efficacy in persons with Type 2 diabetes. AN: MN030287</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:58:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:58:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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