Congruence in Family Dyadic Perceptions of Pain Controllability between Older Adult Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159399
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Congruence in Family Dyadic Perceptions of Pain Controllability between Older Adult Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers
Abstract:
Congruence in Family Dyadic Perceptions of Pain Controllability between Older Adult Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Riley-Doucet, Cheryl
Contact Address:Nursing, 3853 Beechcrest, Rochester Hills, MI, 48309, USA
Co-Authors:April Vallerand
Several studies have shown that perception of control over pain contributes to higher levels of well being and thus, is highly valued by both patients and their family caregivers trying to manage cancer pain in the home. However, there have been no studies that have investigated how congruence in family dyadic perceptions of pain controllability between patients and their family caregivers affects outcomes of pain management. The purpose of this descriptive/cross-sectional study was to; 1) examine the relationship between patient and caregiver individual perceived control and patient and caregiver pain control outcomes, such as symptom distress and caregiver burden, and 2) determine the overall effect of family dyadic perceptions of pain controllability on patient and caregiver pain control outcomes. The sample consists of 81 patient & family caregiver dyads recruited from an Outpatient Cancer Clinic within the metro Detroit area. Participants were ambulatory cancer outpatients with pain, with a mean age of 65 years old (SD=7.8) and primary family caregivers, mean age 58 years old (SD=12.8). Self-report questionnaires administered to both patients and caregivers assessed demographic variables, barriers to pain control, knowledge and attitudes, perceived control over pain, symptom distress and caregiver burden. Results indicated that individual perceived control over pain did not significantly change patient and caregiver pain control outcomes. However, a significant positive relationship was found between beliefs that act as barriers to pain control and pain control outcomes. Results further indicated that family dyads with congruent perceptions that the patient’s pain is controllable had less symptom distress and caregiver burden than those who conjointly perceived the pain to be uncontrollable. These results illuminate the significance of congruence in positive family perceptions of pain controllability when helping older adult cancer patients and their family caregivers mutually plan successful pain management goals at home. AN: MN030111
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCongruence in Family Dyadic Perceptions of Pain Controllability between Older Adult Cancer Patients and Family Caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159399-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Congruence in Family Dyadic Perceptions of Pain Controllability between Older Adult Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riley-Doucet, Cheryl</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 3853 Beechcrest, Rochester Hills, MI, 48309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">April Vallerand</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Several studies have shown that perception of control over pain contributes to higher levels of well being and thus, is highly valued by both patients and their family caregivers trying to manage cancer pain in the home. However, there have been no studies that have investigated how congruence in family dyadic perceptions of pain controllability between patients and their family caregivers affects outcomes of pain management. The purpose of this descriptive/cross-sectional study was to; 1) examine the relationship between patient and caregiver individual perceived control and patient and caregiver pain control outcomes, such as symptom distress and caregiver burden, and 2) determine the overall effect of family dyadic perceptions of pain controllability on patient and caregiver pain control outcomes. The sample consists of 81 patient &amp; family caregiver dyads recruited from an Outpatient Cancer Clinic within the metro Detroit area. Participants were ambulatory cancer outpatients with pain, with a mean age of 65 years old (SD=7.8) and primary family caregivers, mean age 58 years old (SD=12.8). Self-report questionnaires administered to both patients and caregivers assessed demographic variables, barriers to pain control, knowledge and attitudes, perceived control over pain, symptom distress and caregiver burden. Results indicated that individual perceived control over pain did not significantly change patient and caregiver pain control outcomes. However, a significant positive relationship was found between beliefs that act as barriers to pain control and pain control outcomes. Results further indicated that family dyads with congruent perceptions that the patient&rsquo;s pain is controllable had less symptom distress and caregiver burden than those who conjointly perceived the pain to be uncontrollable. These results illuminate the significance of congruence in positive family perceptions of pain controllability when helping older adult cancer patients and their family caregivers mutually plan successful pain management goals at home. AN: MN030111 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:58:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:58:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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