2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159400
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validity of Children's Human Figure Drawings as a Measure of Anxiety
Abstract:
Validity of Children's Human Figure Drawings as a Measure of Anxiety
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Ryan-Wenger, Nancy
Contact Address:CON, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Co-Authors:Vicki W. Sharrer
Although not without some controversy, children’s drawings are commonly used in clinical practice and research to assess children’s emotional status. Pioneers in this field have shown that the quality and contents of a drawing reveal the artist’s self-concept, anxieties, attitudes and conflicts, and changes in these characteristics over time. The evidence for validity of drawings is based primarily on significant differences between drawings of children with and without diagnoses of emotional problems or psychopathology. Rarely are drawing analyses compared with standardized instruments that measure related concepts such as anxiety or depression. This presentation is a secondary analysis of data collected from 91 children, ages 8 to 11 in a study that examined the impact of the threat of war on children in military families. The sample represented children from seven states and a variety of socioeconomic levels. The purpose of this analysis was to examine the validity of human figure drawings (HFD) as a measure of anxiety in school-age children. The study data included HFDs and the Revised Children’s Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS), a 37-item self-report questionnaire. HFDs were examined for the presence of 21 mutually exclusive characteristics called Emotional Indicators (EI). The relationship between total number of EIs and anxiety scores was relatively high (eta=0.607). Eight of the 37 RCMAS items were lie scale items. Of the remaining 29 anxiety items, 26 were significantly related to one or more EIs on the drawings. Nearly all of the EIs (17 of 21) were significantly related to one or more anxiety scale items. For example, absence of feet correlated with 10 RCMAS items and poor integration of body parts correlated with 4 items. These findings provide empirical support for the use of human figure drawings as a proxy measure of anxiety. Drawings are a non-threatening, age-appropriate, fun activity for children. AN: MN030377
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidity of Children's Human Figure Drawings as a Measure of Anxietyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159400-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Validity of Children's Human Figure Drawings as a Measure of Anxiety</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ryan-Wenger, Nancy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Vicki W. Sharrer</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although not without some controversy, children&rsquo;s drawings are commonly used in clinical practice and research to assess children&rsquo;s emotional status. Pioneers in this field have shown that the quality and contents of a drawing reveal the artist&rsquo;s self-concept, anxieties, attitudes and conflicts, and changes in these characteristics over time. The evidence for validity of drawings is based primarily on significant differences between drawings of children with and without diagnoses of emotional problems or psychopathology. Rarely are drawing analyses compared with standardized instruments that measure related concepts such as anxiety or depression. This presentation is a secondary analysis of data collected from 91 children, ages 8 to 11 in a study that examined the impact of the threat of war on children in military families. The sample represented children from seven states and a variety of socioeconomic levels. The purpose of this analysis was to examine the validity of human figure drawings (HFD) as a measure of anxiety in school-age children. The study data included HFDs and the Revised Children&rsquo;s Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS), a 37-item self-report questionnaire. HFDs were examined for the presence of 21 mutually exclusive characteristics called Emotional Indicators (EI). The relationship between total number of EIs and anxiety scores was relatively high (eta=0.607). Eight of the 37 RCMAS items were lie scale items. Of the remaining 29 anxiety items, 26 were significantly related to one or more EIs on the drawings. Nearly all of the EIs (17 of 21) were significantly related to one or more anxiety scale items. For example, absence of feet correlated with 10 RCMAS items and poor integration of body parts correlated with 4 items. These findings provide empirical support for the use of human figure drawings as a proxy measure of anxiety. Drawings are a non-threatening, age-appropriate, fun activity for children. AN: MN030377 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:58:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:58:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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