Professional and Personal Caregivers: The Effects of Multiple Caregiving Roles Among Hospital Staff Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159404
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Professional and Personal Caregivers: The Effects of Multiple Caregiving Roles Among Hospital Staff Nurses
Abstract:
Professional and Personal Caregivers: The Effects of Multiple Caregiving Roles Among Hospital Staff Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Scott, Linda
Contact Address:Kirkhof School of Nursing, 354C DeVos, 401 W. Fulton, Grand Rapids, MI, 49504, USA
Co-Authors:Ann E. Rogers; Wei-Ting Hwang
Informal caregiving has been described as a personally gratifying, yet physically exhausting and psychologically distressing experience. Furthermore, feelings of fatigue, burden, and stress may escalate when the caregiver is employed outside the home, and must manage multiple roles and responsibilities. However, little is know about these outcome variables when individuals assume dual roles as personal and professional caregivers. Purpose: One objective of this large national study on staff nurse fatigue and patient safety is to examine the level of stress and fatigue among full-time hospital staff nurses who provide care for aging family members on a regular basis. Additionally, this study explores differences in stress and fatigue levels between full-time hospital staff nurses with and without children in the home. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Pearlin’s (1990) model of caregiver stress provides conceptual guidance for this aspect of the study. Subjects/Methods: Participants were randomly selected from the American Nurses Association national membership list. Eligible participants completed a demographic questionnaire and two logbooks that provided self-reported perceptions of stress, as well as mental and physical fatigue daily for a period of 28 days. Currently, 440 hospital staff nurses have enrolled in the study. Results/Conclusions: Data analysis, which will be completed by October 2002, will include descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate procedures. AN: MN030281
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProfessional and Personal Caregivers: The Effects of Multiple Caregiving Roles Among Hospital Staff Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159404-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Professional and Personal Caregivers: The Effects of Multiple Caregiving Roles Among Hospital Staff Nurses </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scott, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Kirkhof School of Nursing, 354C DeVos, 401 W. Fulton, Grand Rapids, MI, 49504, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann E. Rogers; Wei-Ting Hwang</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Informal caregiving has been described as a personally gratifying, yet physically exhausting and psychologically distressing experience. Furthermore, feelings of fatigue, burden, and stress may escalate when the caregiver is employed outside the home, and must manage multiple roles and responsibilities. However, little is know about these outcome variables when individuals assume dual roles as personal and professional caregivers. Purpose: One objective of this large national study on staff nurse fatigue and patient safety is to examine the level of stress and fatigue among full-time hospital staff nurses who provide care for aging family members on a regular basis. Additionally, this study explores differences in stress and fatigue levels between full-time hospital staff nurses with and without children in the home. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Pearlin&rsquo;s (1990) model of caregiver stress provides conceptual guidance for this aspect of the study. Subjects/Methods: Participants were randomly selected from the American Nurses Association national membership list. Eligible participants completed a demographic questionnaire and two logbooks that provided self-reported perceptions of stress, as well as mental and physical fatigue daily for a period of 28 days. Currently, 440 hospital staff nurses have enrolled in the study. Results/Conclusions: Data analysis, which will be completed by October 2002, will include descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate procedures. AN: MN030281 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:59:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:59:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.