Differences in Factors Affecting Feelings of Competency in New Mothers and Fathers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159406
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Differences in Factors Affecting Feelings of Competency in New Mothers and Fathers
Abstract:
Differences in Factors Affecting Feelings of Competency in New Mothers and Fathers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Sink, Katherine
Contact Address:SON
In the transition to parenthood, parents need information about a life situation that is new to them. These parents receive support from many individuals who provide varied and sometimes inaccurate information often leading to confusion and frustration. Using the theoretical frameworks of Kaplan (1973) and King (1981), this portion of the study investigates factors that facilitate increasing parental competency in newborn care. A total of 89 expectant mothers and 27 fathers were recruited from childbirth classes and completed all phases of the longitudinal quasi-experimental study. Mothers indicated that those who had problems, especially with feeding or infant care, had decreased feelings of maternal competency. Factors that impacted on the mother's confidence included having larger babies, the experience of the postpartum hospitalization, especially those having a positive hospital stay, and having sensitive hospital nurses who met their needs. The mothers also felt more competent for baby care if they had encouraging friends and relatives, felt prepared, had adjusted to parenthood, and had gotten enough sleep. Fathers revealed that overall confidence in care of the newborn is closely related to the size of the baby and mother's postpartum health. The postpartum hospitalization experience impacted the father's confidence related to the availability of nurses and physician or midwife to answer his questions, sensitive doctors, and pleasant surroundings. The results supported King's theory by nurse and parent working together towards the mutual health goal of increasing parental confidence. Consistent with Kaplan's theory, uncertainty, mismatch, and presenting information when the recipient was not ready for it created problems that undermined feelings of competency. Having a postpartum stay with caring, sensitive nurses increased new parents feelings of confidence. Having nurturing, informative nurse-initiated postpartum contact, ideally a home visit, or telephone call, assisted parents in problem solving and increasing their feelings of competency. AN: MN030131
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDifferences in Factors Affecting Feelings of Competency in New Mothers and Fathersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159406-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Differences in Factors Affecting Feelings of Competency in New Mothers and Fathers </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sink, Katherine</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In the transition to parenthood, parents need information about a life situation that is new to them. These parents receive support from many individuals who provide varied and sometimes inaccurate information often leading to confusion and frustration. Using the theoretical frameworks of Kaplan (1973) and King (1981), this portion of the study investigates factors that facilitate increasing parental competency in newborn care. A total of 89 expectant mothers and 27 fathers were recruited from childbirth classes and completed all phases of the longitudinal quasi-experimental study. Mothers indicated that those who had problems, especially with feeding or infant care, had decreased feelings of maternal competency. Factors that impacted on the mother's confidence included having larger babies, the experience of the postpartum hospitalization, especially those having a positive hospital stay, and having sensitive hospital nurses who met their needs. The mothers also felt more competent for baby care if they had encouraging friends and relatives, felt prepared, had adjusted to parenthood, and had gotten enough sleep. Fathers revealed that overall confidence in care of the newborn is closely related to the size of the baby and mother's postpartum health. The postpartum hospitalization experience impacted the father's confidence related to the availability of nurses and physician or midwife to answer his questions, sensitive doctors, and pleasant surroundings. The results supported King's theory by nurse and parent working together towards the mutual health goal of increasing parental confidence. Consistent with Kaplan's theory, uncertainty, mismatch, and presenting information when the recipient was not ready for it created problems that undermined feelings of competency. Having a postpartum stay with caring, sensitive nurses increased new parents feelings of confidence. Having nurturing, informative nurse-initiated postpartum contact, ideally a home visit, or telephone call, assisted parents in problem solving and increasing their feelings of competency. AN: MN030131 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:59:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:59:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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