2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159407
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Witnessing Violence: Biopsychosocial Impact on Children
Abstract:
Witnessing Violence: Biopsychosocial Impact on Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Skybo, Theresa
Contact Address:CON, 1585 Neil Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Problem: Children of all races, ages, and socioeconomic backgrounds are likely to be exposed to violence. Nationwide, 70% of school-age children are exposed to violence such as gang activities, police arrests, gunshots, and physical assault. More children witness violence than are the victims or perpetrators of violence yet little research focuses on these witnesses. Nurses are concerned about witnessing violence as an acute or chronic stressor in the lives of children. Theoretical framework/Purpose: Based on developmental theory, Lazarus’ stress-coping theory, and a pilot study with 14 Caucasian, Hispanic, and African-American children, the purpose of this study is to examine children’s appraisal of violence they have witnessed and their biopsychosocial responses. The specific aims of this study are: 1. To characterize children’s exposure to violence. 2. To determine the physical, psychological & behavioral responses that children report after exposure to violence. 3. To determine the relationships among gender, types and frequency of exposure, appraisal of violence, and biopsychosocial responses. 4. To determine the effect of type, proximity, timing, and frequency of exposure to violence on children’s report of biopsychosocial symptoms. Methods/Design: A correlational and descriptive design will be used with a convenience sample of 168 children, ages 8-12, from a high-crime, inner-city school district. Data will be collected via 7 open-ended questions (appraisal of violence exposure), a human figure drawing (psychological response), and two self-report instruments (exposure and impact to violence and stress related symptoms). Analysis: Data will be analyzed using descriptive statistics to estimate the scope of the problem (Aims 1 & 2), parametric and nonparametric correlations (Aim 3), and 4-Way-MANOVA (Aim 4). Implications: Findings can be used for nursing interventions to address three of the Surgeon General’s top 10 health challenges: emotional & intellectual development, contribution of mental health to overall health, and decreasing the toll of violence. AN: MN030053
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWitnessing Violence: Biopsychosocial Impact on Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159407-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Witnessing Violence: Biopsychosocial Impact on Children </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Skybo, Theresa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 1585 Neil Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Children of all races, ages, and socioeconomic backgrounds are likely to be exposed to violence. Nationwide, 70% of school-age children are exposed to violence such as gang activities, police arrests, gunshots, and physical assault. More children witness violence than are the victims or perpetrators of violence yet little research focuses on these witnesses. Nurses are concerned about witnessing violence as an acute or chronic stressor in the lives of children. Theoretical framework/Purpose: Based on developmental theory, Lazarus&rsquo; stress-coping theory, and a pilot study with 14 Caucasian, Hispanic, and African-American children, the purpose of this study is to examine children&rsquo;s appraisal of violence they have witnessed and their biopsychosocial responses. The specific aims of this study are: 1. To characterize children&rsquo;s exposure to violence. 2. To determine the physical, psychological &amp; behavioral responses that children report after exposure to violence. 3. To determine the relationships among gender, types and frequency of exposure, appraisal of violence, and biopsychosocial responses. 4. To determine the effect of type, proximity, timing, and frequency of exposure to violence on children&rsquo;s report of biopsychosocial symptoms. Methods/Design: A correlational and descriptive design will be used with a convenience sample of 168 children, ages 8-12, from a high-crime, inner-city school district. Data will be collected via 7 open-ended questions (appraisal of violence exposure), a human figure drawing (psychological response), and two self-report instruments (exposure and impact to violence and stress related symptoms). Analysis: Data will be analyzed using descriptive statistics to estimate the scope of the problem (Aims 1 &amp; 2), parametric and nonparametric correlations (Aim 3), and 4-Way-MANOVA (Aim 4). Implications: Findings can be used for nursing interventions to address three of the Surgeon General&rsquo;s top 10 health challenges: emotional &amp; intellectual development, contribution of mental health to overall health, and decreasing the toll of violence. AN: MN030053</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:59:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:59:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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