2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159408
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A cultural sensitivity model for international research
Abstract:
A cultural sensitivity model for international research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Smith, Eva
Contact Address:Medical-Surgical Nursing, UIC College of Nursing, M/C 802, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
The goals of this presentation are to describe a model for enhancing cultural sensitivity in conducting international research, and to discuss quality of life (QOL) for Black South African women (BSAW) with breast cancer (BRCA). Challenges exist for investigators who conduct research with participants from a different culture. In South Africa (SA) where the target population consists of nine major ethnic groups, an American investigator who conducted a study of the QOL of BSAW with BRCA faced multiple challenges. She used a cultural sensitivity model that incorporated four components: (1) participating in Black SA culture, (2) developing an interdisciplinary research committee, (3) conducting focus groups with nurses, (4) working with SA mentors, and (5) participating as staff in the BRCA clinics in the hospital and community. The process provided for including qualitative culture questions that amplified quantitative findings, and ongoing interpretation of research findings by the research team from the cultural perspective of participants. The process of implementing the model will be discussed. BRCA is a major public health problem in SA with BSAW having lower incidence rates and higher mortality rates than White SA women. BRCA is the second type of cancer among BSAW and the second type of cancer death. Participants were 260 BSAW who were receiving BRCA care at two BRCA clinics. Multi-lingual nurses collected QOL data from BSAW in face-to-face interviews, using Ferrans' Quality of Life Index. Findings indicate BSAW view their QOL as moderately high, with the highest quality in family (mean=25.12-85.7%) and psychological (M=24.99 -83.3%) functioning, and lowest in health (M=20.85-69.5%) and social (M=21.61- 72.0%) functioning. Correlates were found between education and all four subscales, and stage at diagnosis and health functioning and total QOL. Personal, institutional, and societal barriers to cancer care will be discussed. Findings have implications for improving BSAW QOL. AN: MN030062
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA cultural sensitivity model for international researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159408-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A cultural sensitivity model for international research </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Eva</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical-Surgical Nursing, UIC College of Nursing, M/C 802, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The goals of this presentation are to describe a model for enhancing cultural sensitivity in conducting international research, and to discuss quality of life (QOL) for Black South African women (BSAW) with breast cancer (BRCA). Challenges exist for investigators who conduct research with participants from a different culture. In South Africa (SA) where the target population consists of nine major ethnic groups, an American investigator who conducted a study of the QOL of BSAW with BRCA faced multiple challenges. She used a cultural sensitivity model that incorporated four components: (1) participating in Black SA culture, (2) developing an interdisciplinary research committee, (3) conducting focus groups with nurses, (4) working with SA mentors, and (5) participating as staff in the BRCA clinics in the hospital and community. The process provided for including qualitative culture questions that amplified quantitative findings, and ongoing interpretation of research findings by the research team from the cultural perspective of participants. The process of implementing the model will be discussed. BRCA is a major public health problem in SA with BSAW having lower incidence rates and higher mortality rates than White SA women. BRCA is the second type of cancer among BSAW and the second type of cancer death. Participants were 260 BSAW who were receiving BRCA care at two BRCA clinics. Multi-lingual nurses collected QOL data from BSAW in face-to-face interviews, using Ferrans' Quality of Life Index. Findings indicate BSAW view their QOL as moderately high, with the highest quality in family (mean=25.12-85.7%) and psychological (M=24.99 -83.3%) functioning, and lowest in health (M=20.85-69.5%) and social (M=21.61- 72.0%) functioning. Correlates were found between education and all four subscales, and stage at diagnosis and health functioning and total QOL. Personal, institutional, and societal barriers to cancer care will be discussed. Findings have implications for improving BSAW QOL. AN: MN030062 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:59:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:59:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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