Healing Traumatizing Provider Interactions Among Women Via Short-Term Group Therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159411
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Healing Traumatizing Provider Interactions Among Women Via Short-Term Group Therapy
Abstract:
Healing Traumatizing Provider Interactions Among Women Via Short-Term Group Therapy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Sorenson, Dianna
Contact Address:Graduate Nursing, 4608 S. Briarwood Ave, Sioux Falls, SD, 57103, USA
The purpose of this investigation was to test a short-term, cognitive group therapy intervention method to reduce or resolve ongoing psychological disruption and/or trauma among women who experienced traumatizing provider interactions (TPI) in their childbearing experience. Peplau’s Interpersonal Theory guided the investigation. The sample consisted of 9 women who identified traumatizing provider interactions during their childbearing experience. All were married, Caucasian, ages 26-45, with some college education and had 1-5 children (n=19). Pre-intervention assessment of birth trauma, post-traumatic childbirth stress and traumatizing provider interactions were conducted for each individual birth experience. Birth Trauma Scores ranged from 2 (best) to 10 (very traumatic) with a mean of 6 (mdn=6; SD=3.06) among the 19 births. The highest Birth Trauma Score for each woman ranged from 5-10 (mean=8.56; mdn=9; SD=1.51), and the average Birth Trauma Score across all births for each woman (n=9) ranged from 5-10 (mean=6.68; mdn=5.66; SD=2.04). Post-Traumatic Childbirth Stress scores averaged 48.16 (mdn=59; SD=20) and Traumatizing Provider Interaction scores averaged 91.47 (mdn=99; SD=27.73). Descriptive statistical comparisons of measures of central tendency, box plot comparison, and Wilcoson Signed Ranks among variables for all scores revealed marked psychological improvement in each scale pre- and post-intervention measurements among UCLA Loneliness Scale III (means=58.33 pre; 24.44 post), Coopersmith Self-Esteem Scale (means=62.67 pre; 83.56 post), Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Index (state means=47.78 pre and 13.11 post; trait mean=53.89 pre and 18.78 post) and Beck Depression Inventory (means=19.33 pre and 9.78 post). The effectiveness a short-term, intensive cognitive group therapy for women who identified traumatizing provider interactions during their childbearing experience is clearly evidenced. AN: MN030184
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealing Traumatizing Provider Interactions Among Women Via Short-Term Group Therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159411-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Healing Traumatizing Provider Interactions Among Women Via Short-Term Group Therapy </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sorenson, Dianna</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Graduate Nursing, 4608 S. Briarwood Ave, Sioux Falls, SD, 57103, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this investigation was to test a short-term, cognitive group therapy intervention method to reduce or resolve ongoing psychological disruption and/or trauma among women who experienced traumatizing provider interactions (TPI) in their childbearing experience. Peplau&rsquo;s Interpersonal Theory guided the investigation. The sample consisted of 9 women who identified traumatizing provider interactions during their childbearing experience. All were married, Caucasian, ages 26-45, with some college education and had 1-5 children (n=19). Pre-intervention assessment of birth trauma, post-traumatic childbirth stress and traumatizing provider interactions were conducted for each individual birth experience. Birth Trauma Scores ranged from 2 (best) to 10 (very traumatic) with a mean of 6 (mdn=6; SD=3.06) among the 19 births. The highest Birth Trauma Score for each woman ranged from 5-10 (mean=8.56; mdn=9; SD=1.51), and the average Birth Trauma Score across all births for each woman (n=9) ranged from 5-10 (mean=6.68; mdn=5.66; SD=2.04). Post-Traumatic Childbirth Stress scores averaged 48.16 (mdn=59; SD=20) and Traumatizing Provider Interaction scores averaged 91.47 (mdn=99; SD=27.73). Descriptive statistical comparisons of measures of central tendency, box plot comparison, and Wilcoson Signed Ranks among variables for all scores revealed marked psychological improvement in each scale pre- and post-intervention measurements among UCLA Loneliness Scale III (means=58.33 pre; 24.44 post), Coopersmith Self-Esteem Scale (means=62.67 pre; 83.56 post), Spielberger&rsquo;s State-Trait Anxiety Index (state means=47.78 pre and 13.11 post; trait mean=53.89 pre and 18.78 post) and Beck Depression Inventory (means=19.33 pre and 9.78 post). The effectiveness a short-term, intensive cognitive group therapy for women who identified traumatizing provider interactions during their childbearing experience is clearly evidenced. AN: MN030184 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:59:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:59:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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