Icelandic families of children with cancer: Longitudinal research on parents general well-being

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159413
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Icelandic families of children with cancer: Longitudinal research on parents general well-being
Abstract:
Icelandic families of children with cancer: Longitudinal research on parents general well-being
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Svavarsdóttir, Erla
Contact Address:Faculty of Nursing, Eirberg, Eiriksgata #34, Reykjavik, IS-101, Iceland
In Iceland about 12 to 14 children are diagnosed with cancer each year, which is similar ratio as in other western countries. Cancer in children is a serious health condition and is one of the main causes of death in children and adolescent in Iceland. Families of children with cancer need to adapt to the health condition of their child and to care on a daily basis for other members of the family. However, it is unknown how Icelandic nurses can intervene with these families in order to foster parents’ well-being. The purpose of this research was to evaluate at three time periods (over one and a half year) parents caregiving demands, their general well being and how they perceived the health status of their child with cancer. The conceptual framework for the study was the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment and Adaptation (McCubbin & McCubbin, 1993; 1996). Twenty-six families of children and adolescent with cancer participated in the study. Data was collected in 1999-2001 all over Iceland. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were used in data analysis. The main finding indicated that parents experienced the most difficult and time-consuming caregiving task across time to be “giving the child with cancer emotional support” and to give other children in the family emotional support. In addition, fathers found it difficult to give their wife’s emotional support and managing work outside the home and organizing cancer treatments at the same time. Mothers found it difficult to manage discipline and behavioral problems; to coordinate and manage services and resources; and to structure and plane activities for the whole family. Well-being of the parents did not differ significantly over time nor did their perception of the health status of the child. Discussion of findings and implication for practice and future research will be introduced. AN: MN030193
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIcelandic families of children with cancer: Longitudinal research on parents general well-beingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159413-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Icelandic families of children with cancer: Longitudinal research on parents general well-being </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Svavarsd&oacute;ttir, Erla</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Nursing, Eirberg, Eiriksgata #34, Reykjavik, IS-101, Iceland</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In Iceland about 12 to 14 children are diagnosed with cancer each year, which is similar ratio as in other western countries. Cancer in children is a serious health condition and is one of the main causes of death in children and adolescent in Iceland. Families of children with cancer need to adapt to the health condition of their child and to care on a daily basis for other members of the family. However, it is unknown how Icelandic nurses can intervene with these families in order to foster parents&rsquo; well-being. The purpose of this research was to evaluate at three time periods (over one and a half year) parents caregiving demands, their general well being and how they perceived the health status of their child with cancer. The conceptual framework for the study was the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment and Adaptation (McCubbin &amp; McCubbin, 1993; 1996). Twenty-six families of children and adolescent with cancer participated in the study. Data was collected in 1999-2001 all over Iceland. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were used in data analysis. The main finding indicated that parents experienced the most difficult and time-consuming caregiving task across time to be &ldquo;giving the child with cancer emotional support&rdquo; and to give other children in the family emotional support. In addition, fathers found it difficult to give their wife&rsquo;s emotional support and managing work outside the home and organizing cancer treatments at the same time. Mothers found it difficult to manage discipline and behavioral problems; to coordinate and manage services and resources; and to structure and plane activities for the whole family. Well-being of the parents did not differ significantly over time nor did their perception of the health status of the child. Discussion of findings and implication for practice and future research will be introduced. AN: MN030193 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:59:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:59:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.