2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159415
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Uses of the Implied Correlation Matrix in Structural Equation Modeling
Abstract:
Uses of the Implied Correlation Matrix in Structural Equation Modeling
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Templin, Thomas
Contact Address:CON, 5557 Cass Ave. Room 321, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Co-Authors:Edythe Hough; Gail Brumitt
Structural equation modeling (SEM) is frequently used to test nursing theory. Graphically-oriented/user-friendly software is contributing to increasing use but not to increased understanding. There is some concern that misapplication may lead to erroneous conclusions or interpretation. A key to understanding SEM is knowledge of how to construct the implied correlation matrix from the path diagram. This knowledge has eluded researchers because the operations are most often couched in the language and rules of matrix operations and covariance algebra. This tutorial presentation will demonstrate the key concept of the implied correlation matrix without resorting to matrix algebra. Participants will achieve greater understanding of (a) model testing in SEM, (b) the problem of equivalent models, (c) the way in which SEM corrects for measurement error, and (d) the use of the residual matrix to evaluate model fit. Examples from the investigators’ currently funded research with HIV positive mothers and youth at risk and from the nursing literature will be used to introduce the rules and for substantive interpretation. AN: MN030371
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUses of the Implied Correlation Matrix in Structural Equation Modelingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159415-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Uses of the Implied Correlation Matrix in Structural Equation Modeling </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Templin, Thomas</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 5557 Cass Ave. Room 321, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Edythe Hough; Gail Brumitt</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Structural equation modeling (SEM) is frequently used to test nursing theory. Graphically-oriented/user-friendly software is contributing to increasing use but not to increased understanding. There is some concern that misapplication may lead to erroneous conclusions or interpretation. A key to understanding SEM is knowledge of how to construct the implied correlation matrix from the path diagram. This knowledge has eluded researchers because the operations are most often couched in the language and rules of matrix operations and covariance algebra. This tutorial presentation will demonstrate the key concept of the implied correlation matrix without resorting to matrix algebra. Participants will achieve greater understanding of (a) model testing in SEM, (b) the problem of equivalent models, (c) the way in which SEM corrects for measurement error, and (d) the use of the residual matrix to evaluate model fit. Examples from the investigators&rsquo; currently funded research with HIV positive mothers and youth at risk and from the nursing literature will be used to introduce the rules and for substantive interpretation. AN: MN030371 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:59:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:59:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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