2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159417
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teaching Critical Thinking Skills to Novice Nurses in Clinical Settings
Abstract:
Teaching Critical Thinking Skills to Novice Nurses in Clinical Settings
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Twibell, K.
Contact Address:SON, Cooper Science Building, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA
Co-Authors:Marilyn Ryan; Mary Hermiz
Critical thinking skills are essential for competent nursing practice. However, few research studies have investigated strategies for teaching critical thinking skills to novice nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of clinical nursing instructors when teaching critical thinking behaviors to baccalaureate nursing students in clinical settings. The conceptual framework for the study was the consensus statement on critical thinking in nursing, developed through a Delphi method with 55 nursing experts (Scheffer & Rubenfeld, 2000). The design was exploratory and focused on probing critical thinking as a holistic, contextual phenomenon. The methodology selected was a qualitative, multiple case study approach. Participants were six experienced clinical nursing instructors from five clinical specialty areas. Informants directly guided the clinical experience of upper division students at the time of data collection. Each informant was interviewed three times. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Spradley’s (1979) domain and taxonomic analyses guided analysis of the data. Results of data analysis indicated a consensus that critical thinking was a synthesis process, one that was widely characterized as “putting it all together.” The emergence of this domain was congruent in part with Scheffer and Rubenfeld’s (2000) definition of critical thinking. Results further suggested a taxonomy of strategies for teaching critical thinking skills that was consistent across clinical specialty areas. Contextual questioning was a primary approach; others included case scenarios, clinical conferences, and written exercises. These results provide direction for nurses who mentor others or teach critical thinking in clinical practice. The significance of this study lies in the rich descriptions of how clinical instructors conceptualize critical thinking and foster its development. Further research is required to clarify differences and similarities between problem-solving skills, decision-making skills, and critical thinking skills and how such skills are most effectively taught to specific subgroups of nurses. AN: MN030340
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeaching Critical Thinking Skills to Novice Nurses in Clinical Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159417-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Teaching Critical Thinking Skills to Novice Nurses in Clinical Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Twibell, K.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Cooper Science Building, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn Ryan; Mary Hermiz</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Critical thinking skills are essential for competent nursing practice. However, few research studies have investigated strategies for teaching critical thinking skills to novice nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of clinical nursing instructors when teaching critical thinking behaviors to baccalaureate nursing students in clinical settings. The conceptual framework for the study was the consensus statement on critical thinking in nursing, developed through a Delphi method with 55 nursing experts (Scheffer &amp; Rubenfeld, 2000). The design was exploratory and focused on probing critical thinking as a holistic, contextual phenomenon. The methodology selected was a qualitative, multiple case study approach. Participants were six experienced clinical nursing instructors from five clinical specialty areas. Informants directly guided the clinical experience of upper division students at the time of data collection. Each informant was interviewed three times. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Spradley&rsquo;s (1979) domain and taxonomic analyses guided analysis of the data. Results of data analysis indicated a consensus that critical thinking was a synthesis process, one that was widely characterized as &ldquo;putting it all together.&rdquo; The emergence of this domain was congruent in part with Scheffer and Rubenfeld&rsquo;s (2000) definition of critical thinking. Results further suggested a taxonomy of strategies for teaching critical thinking skills that was consistent across clinical specialty areas. Contextual questioning was a primary approach; others included case scenarios, clinical conferences, and written exercises. These results provide direction for nurses who mentor others or teach critical thinking in clinical practice. The significance of this study lies in the rich descriptions of how clinical instructors conceptualize critical thinking and foster its development. Further research is required to clarify differences and similarities between problem-solving skills, decision-making skills, and critical thinking skills and how such skills are most effectively taught to specific subgroups of nurses. AN: MN030340 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:59:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:59:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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