Race and Prenatal Health Promotion Content Among Low-Income African-American and Mexican-American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159419
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Race and Prenatal Health Promotion Content Among Low-Income African-American and Mexican-American Women
Abstract:
Race and Prenatal Health Promotion Content Among Low-Income African-American and Mexican-American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Vonderheid, Susan
Contact Address:SON, 218 South Calumet Avenue, Aurora, IL, 60506, USA
Co-Authors:Kristen S. Montgomery; Kathleen F. Norr
Purpose: Improving prenatal care to meet women's health promotion education needs might reduce racial and ethnic disparities in infant and maternal outcomes. The purposes of this study were to (a) identify differences between the health promotion content topics women wanted to discuss during routine prenatal care and the topics women reported discussing and (b) determine whether race/ethnicity was related to health promotion content controlling for other maternal and prenatal care characteristics. Conceptual Framework: Donabedian's model for quality assessment. Subjects: 159 Mexican-American and African-American pregnant women attending prenatal care in a large Midwestern tertiary care center clinic who met the low-income criteria for Medicaid or state-subsidized health care coverage. Methods: This study analyzes data from a cross-sectional investigation that examined the relationship between prenatal health promotion content, satisfaction with care and maternal health behaviors. Data were collected using face-to-face interviews. Analyses included bivariate statistics to examine differences between health promotion topics women wanted and the topics they reported discussing; and multiple regression to predict which factors contributed to the discussion of health promotion content. Results: Overall, women wanted more health promotion content than they reported actually discussing. Mexican-American women wanted to discuss more prenatal health promotion topics than African-American women, but reported discussing fewer topics than African-American women. Race, number of topics women wanted to discuss, whether women had a primary provider, and type of prenatal provider model (nurse midwife or physician) had significant independent relationships with content discussed. Conclusions: Improvements in the quality of prenatal health education and promotion are needed. In this sample, women's health promotion needs were not met with routine prenatal care. Further research is needed to identify the reasons for racial disparities and the most effective way(s) to deliver comprehensive prenatal health promotion content for all racial and ethnic groups. AN: MN030288
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRace and Prenatal Health Promotion Content Among Low-Income African-American and Mexican-American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159419-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Race and Prenatal Health Promotion Content Among Low-Income African-American and Mexican-American Women </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vonderheid, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 218 South Calumet Avenue, Aurora, IL, 60506, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kristen S. Montgomery; Kathleen F. Norr</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Improving prenatal care to meet women's health promotion education needs might reduce racial and ethnic disparities in infant and maternal outcomes. The purposes of this study were to (a) identify differences between the health promotion content topics women wanted to discuss during routine prenatal care and the topics women reported discussing and (b) determine whether race/ethnicity was related to health promotion content controlling for other maternal and prenatal care characteristics. Conceptual Framework: Donabedian's model for quality assessment. Subjects: 159 Mexican-American and African-American pregnant women attending prenatal care in a large Midwestern tertiary care center clinic who met the low-income criteria for Medicaid or state-subsidized health care coverage. Methods: This study analyzes data from a cross-sectional investigation that examined the relationship between prenatal health promotion content, satisfaction with care and maternal health behaviors. Data were collected using face-to-face interviews. Analyses included bivariate statistics to examine differences between health promotion topics women wanted and the topics they reported discussing; and multiple regression to predict which factors contributed to the discussion of health promotion content. Results: Overall, women wanted more health promotion content than they reported actually discussing. Mexican-American women wanted to discuss more prenatal health promotion topics than African-American women, but reported discussing fewer topics than African-American women. Race, number of topics women wanted to discuss, whether women had a primary provider, and type of prenatal provider model (nurse midwife or physician) had significant independent relationships with content discussed. Conclusions: Improvements in the quality of prenatal health education and promotion are needed. In this sample, women's health promotion needs were not met with routine prenatal care. Further research is needed to identify the reasons for racial disparities and the most effective way(s) to deliver comprehensive prenatal health promotion content for all racial and ethnic groups. AN: MN030288 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:59:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:59:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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