Eligibility Screening for a Walking Program for Community AA Women: The Challenges

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159423
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Eligibility Screening for a Walking Program for Community AA Women: The Challenges
Abstract:
Eligibility Screening for a Walking Program for Community AA Women: The Challenges
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Wilber, JoEllen
Contact Address:, USA
Co-Authors:Judith McDevitt; Gwendolyn Robinson; Annemarie Vassalo; Glen Picard; Joan Briller; Peggy Chandler
The purpose of this paper is to discuss the challenges in screening midlife African American women to identify those who can safely participate in a moderate intensity walking program without excluding those who would benefit the most. ACSM guidelines suggest that prior to beginning an exercise program physical examination and exercise testing are essential to insure both safety and effectiveness. This has particular importance for African Americans who, according to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data, have higher rates of four risk factors for cardiovascular disease compared to White women: obesity, elevated blood pressures, history of diabetes, and a sedentary lifestyle. The exercise prescription for this 48-week home-based intervention included walking at a frequency of 3 to 4 days per week for 30 continuous minutes at a moderate intensity. Exclusion criteria were: major signs or symptoms suggestive of pulmonary or cardiovascular disease; history of MI, stroke, type 1 diabetes; BP > 160/100 mm Hg; use of beta-blockers or verapamil. Women were screened at a community health center located in a predominantly low-income, African American community. Screening included: telephone screening with the eligibility questionnaire followed by a complete history and physical by an APN, routine blood chemistry with lipoproteins, blood count, UA, 12-lead EKG and a maximal aerobic fitness test. Data are presented for 200 women screened in the first 6 months of recruitment. Health assessment results (e.g., cardiovascular risk factors, high blood pressure, blood and EKG abnormalities) contributing to the number of ineligible subjects will be presented. In addition, the percent of screening appointments adhered to and strategies for increasing adherence will be discussed. Conclusions will provide researchers with the information needed for planning the screening phase of exercise interventions targeting community samples of African American women. AN: MN030150
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEligibility Screening for a Walking Program for Community AA Women: The Challengesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159423-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Eligibility Screening for a Walking Program for Community AA Women: The Challenges </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilber, JoEllen</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith McDevitt; Gwendolyn Robinson; Annemarie Vassalo; Glen Picard; Joan Briller; Peggy Chandler </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this paper is to discuss the challenges in screening midlife African American women to identify those who can safely participate in a moderate intensity walking program without excluding those who would benefit the most. ACSM guidelines suggest that prior to beginning an exercise program physical examination and exercise testing are essential to insure both safety and effectiveness. This has particular importance for African Americans who, according to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data, have higher rates of four risk factors for cardiovascular disease compared to White women: obesity, elevated blood pressures, history of diabetes, and a sedentary lifestyle. The exercise prescription for this 48-week home-based intervention included walking at a frequency of 3 to 4 days per week for 30 continuous minutes at a moderate intensity. Exclusion criteria were: major signs or symptoms suggestive of pulmonary or cardiovascular disease; history of MI, stroke, type 1 diabetes; BP &gt; 160/100 mm Hg; use of beta-blockers or verapamil. Women were screened at a community health center located in a predominantly low-income, African American community. Screening included: telephone screening with the eligibility questionnaire followed by a complete history and physical by an APN, routine blood chemistry with lipoproteins, blood count, UA, 12-lead EKG and a maximal aerobic fitness test. Data are presented for 200 women screened in the first 6 months of recruitment. Health assessment results (e.g., cardiovascular risk factors, high blood pressure, blood and EKG abnormalities) contributing to the number of ineligible subjects will be presented. In addition, the percent of screening appointments adhered to and strategies for increasing adherence will be discussed. Conclusions will provide researchers with the information needed for planning the screening phase of exercise interventions targeting community samples of African American women. AN: MN030150 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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